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I have some links to wikipedia articles, for example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_jobs when you visit that link, you will see right under the article's title: (Redirected from Steve jobs) If you follow that link you will eventually reach a page with the same URL except that Steve_jobs has a capital J for jobs. So it would look like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Jobs

Is there a way I can retrieve the latter link using the first one?

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Yes. Do you want to know it from the page, or do you want to use the API? – Bergi May 22 '12 at 18:38
    
I want to automate the process as i have quite a few links.. so maybe using the API or any other way (like crawling the page for example) – Mohamed Khamis May 22 '12 at 19:27
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can find out where does a certain title redirect to by API query like:

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php?action=query&titles=Steve%20jobs&redirects

If you want the result in XML, add &format=xml to the URL, or &format=json for JSON.

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I also found that this: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php?action=query&titles=steve%20jobs&redirects&pr‌​op=info&inprop=url|protection|talkid&format=json can get the full link – Mohamed Khamis Jun 3 '12 at 18:41
    
Yes, but you don't need protection or talkid for that. – svick Jun 3 '12 at 18:47

Just use the query api. With http://en.wikipedia.org/w/api.php?action=query&titles=Steve+jobs|steve+jobs|steve+Jobs|Steve+Jobs&redirects you will get your titles normalized and redirected. See the api documentation for further options, especially the formats.

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