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I have a problem with a page that's taking a long time to refresh a drop-down list. Basically on changing one drop-down value in a form, the potential options for a second drop-down change to a different list.

How can I speed this up? I'm using REDIS already for other reasons if that can help.

Thanks!

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If you look in log/development.log are there any obviously slow queries or partial renders? –  tadman May 22 '12 at 18:57
    
I pretty much understand the queries, I'm really looking more for info on caching or other approaches that won't require a database lookup on the server when someone changes a drop down in their browser. –  Kevin Bedell May 22 '12 at 19:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have few options in your primary select, then you could set all the possible secondary options in a js hash of arrays when you first render the page, then on change of the primary, lookup from this client-side js array - this is obviously fast, but could slow initial page load or bloat the page size if there are too many options.

Another way would be still make an ajax call when the primary select is changed, but cache the action that returns the secondary options. This would allow it to cache based on params form the request, and use the rendered result in the rails cache when possible (instead of always hitting redis or the db).

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I'm currently storing all the possible options in a client-side hash. Some of the drop downs have a lot of options. It's slowing down the initial page load. In general, this is a good recommendation -- however I did that and in this case it slowed down initial page load too much. –  Kevin Bedell May 22 '12 at 20:33
    
You could load the secondary options in a file, then add them to the page using a script tag (that javascript file could even be cached by the browser in that case, as well as on the server side). That should help with initial page load, though the downside is that you might have to disable changing the primary select until the script file is loaded. –  Andrew Kuklewicz May 22 '12 at 21:24

Great answer from Andrew Kuklewicz. To add to it...

Use Rails' "Fragment Caching".

If you send it to the client on page load, example.html.erb:

<% cache do %>
  <script>
    var javascript_hash = {name: '<%=@ruby_val%>'};
  </script>
<% end %>

If you need to cache the ajax action's output, example.js.erb:

<% cache do %>
  alert('hello from javascript');
<% end %>

Also, in your action itself, make sure you're only instantiating ActiveRecord::Relation's and not actually executing the queries:

Company.where({name: 'foo'}) # this
Company.where({name: 'foo'}).all # not this
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I'm currently storing all the possible options in a client-side hash. Some of the drop downs have a lot of options. It's slowing down the initial page load. In general, Andrew's is a good recommendation -- however I did that and in this case it slowed down initial page load too much. –  Kevin Bedell May 22 '12 at 20:34
    
I just updated the answer... may make more sense now. –  tybro0103 May 22 '12 at 20:37

A low-tech approach might be to render out static JSON or JavaScript files that can be cached by the client that contains the content of the secondary drop-down.

The simplest version simply writes to some path, for instance /cache/drop_down.state1.js and so forth, where the client retrieves these on demand. You can use the Rails page caching system to save these results in to /public for you automatically so subsequent requests go to the same previously created JavaScript, eliminating the need for a round-trip to the database. They can also be expired as required.

You can do this for each drop-down independently, or if practical, all drop-downs at once and then include it and select the appropriate key from the listing.

This requires building out the client-side script to dynamically create and populate the secondary drop-down field including selecting the appropriate entry if one should be pre-selected. It's not that hard with a helper library like jQuery, though.

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