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I need to combine the power of Javascript's "call()" and "apply()" methods. The problem I am having is that "call()" retains the proper reference to "this", but sends the argument array that I have as an array when I need it sent as function arguments. The "apply()" method sends the arguments to the function just fine when using an array, but I don't know how to send it the proper reference to "this" that the "call()" method seems to naturally have access to.

Below is a simplified version of the code that I have, it probably looks pretty useless, but its a good way to get the point across:

// AN OBJECT THAT HOLDS SOME FUNCTIONS
var main = {};
main.the_number = 15;
main.some_function = function(arg1, arg2, arg3){
    // WOULD VERY MUCH LIKE THIS TO PRINT '15' TO THE SCREEN
    alert(this.the_number);
    // DO SOME STUFF WITH THE ARGUMENTS
    ... 
};
// THIS STORES FUNCTIONS FOR LATER.
//  'hub' has no direct knowledge of 'main'
var hub = {};
hub.methods = [];
hub.methods.push(main.some_function);
hub.do_methods = function(arguments_array){
    for(var i=0; i<this.methods.length; i++){
        // With this one, '15' is printed just fine, but an array holding 'i' is 
        //  just passed instead if 'i' itself
        this.methods[i].call(arguments_array);   
        // With this one, 'i' is passed as a function argument, but now the
        //  'this' reference to main is lost when calling the function 
        this.methods[i].apply(--need a reference to 'main' here--, arguments_array); 
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The first argument of apply sets this to whatever you pass it... if you want this == main then just pass main as the first argument. –  ElatedOwl May 22 '12 at 18:54
    
@Snuffleupagus - Unfortunately, 'hub' has no direct knowledge of 'main' –  Chris Dutrow May 22 '12 at 19:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What? Apply passes the scope as well...

method.apply(this, [args]);

Edit:

In your code you have the main object defined in the containing scope so you can simply do;

this.methods[i].call(main);

or

this.methods[i].apply(main, [args]);
share|improve this answer
    
I may be missing something, but in the context of this code, I don't see how to get to the 'this' that I need to pass to "apply". –  Chris Dutrow May 22 '12 at 18:53
    
It's identical to whatever way you use the call method... –  Jivings May 22 '12 at 18:54
1  
It can't be done then. –  Jivings May 22 '12 at 19:03
1  
Call does not have access to it. The Object being used as this is whatever you pass to it. In your case it was an array. –  Jivings May 22 '12 at 19:07
1  
No problem, glad I could help! All you need to do is save main in hub. Then you can pass it back to the function. –  Jivings May 22 '12 at 19:12

When using apply and call the 1st parameter is what you want this to be set to.

call takes a list of arguments:

.call(main, i, j)

and apply takes an array or arguments:

.apply(main, [i, j])

So, on this line:

this.methods[i].call([i]); 

This passes [i] as this inside this.methods[i].

You probably want to do:

this.methods[i].call(main, i);

This will call this.methods[i], set this to main, and pass i to it.

Or:

this.methods[i].call(main, arguments_array);

This will call this.methods[i], set this to main, and pass the elements of arguments_array as parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
In the context of the code above, how do I get at 'main' so I can pass it to apply? (Assuming that 'hub' has not direct knowledge of 'main'? –  Chris Dutrow May 22 '12 at 18:55
1  
@ChrisDutrow: hub needs to have "direct knowledge" of main. There's no way for it to "figure out" that you want to use main. –  Rocket Hazmat May 22 '12 at 18:57
    
It seems that 'call()' is able to access a reference to 'main' somehow... –  Chris Dutrow May 22 '12 at 19:01
    
I apologize that my example was a little weak. I cannot change the way the arguments are passed, they must be passed as an array and interpreted by the function as normal argument parameters. I changed the example accordingly. –  Chris Dutrow May 22 '12 at 19:03
1  
@ChrisDutrow: Then you want to use .apply instead of .call. Either way, hub needs to know about main for this to work. –  Rocket Hazmat May 22 '12 at 19:06

Just attach a reference to the parent object to the function object:

main.some_function = function () {
    //...
}
main.some_function.parent = main;

// now some_function.parent holds a ref to main

Or, if you like, closures to the rescue: include a reference to main when you define main.some_function:

// self-execution function the returns a function with `that` (i.e., main) in scope
main.some_function = (function(that) {
    return function() {
        alert(that.the_number);
    }
})(main);
share|improve this answer

As I read the comments in the preceding answers, I think, that you need some kind of binding. You can either use jQuery or similar library, or implement it yourself:

var bound_some_function = function(){
    return main.some_function.apply(main, arguments);
}
// ...
hub.methods.push(bound_some_function);
// ...
this.methods[i].apply(null /*whathever, has no effect*/, arguments_array);

Universal definition of a bind function looks like this:

function bind(fun, scope){
    return function(){
        return fun.apply(scope, arguments);
    };
}

For further reading about binding, google "Javascript function binding". There are lots of articles about it.

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