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I have a scenario where I am sending an HTTP request to save/update data on server. Request is made asynchronously and a callback function is called when it completes. Everything works fine except that the application crashes at times in callback. This is what I am doing:

user = new User();
user->saveOnServer();
user->zombie = true; //mark user so we know that it needs to be deleted in callback

In User I have a saveOnServer() method:

void User::saveOnServer(){
    Request *request = new Request();

    //send request on server and register the callback
    request ->setCallback(&userCallback, (void*)this);
}

And then I have a callback:

void userCallback(void *data){
    User *user = (User*)data;

    //do something here
    //delete user if its zombie
    if(user->zombie)
        delete user;
}

At times what happens is that I need to create a new user after sending a request to server so I do following:

user = new User();
user->saveOnServer();
user->zombie = true;
//some code comes here
if(user)
    delete user;
user = new User();

Now the problem is that in such case application crashes when I delete user in callback as it has already been deleted. Another issue is that callback deletes user but user pointer in main is still pointing to some address (dangling pointer) and so I again try to delete it.

I am not sure what is the best way of managing memory in this case. I have zombie in place because at times I do not want callback to delete user. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Why would you want a server to delete an object allocated by a client I'm wondering? –  AJG85 May 22 '12 at 19:15
    
Server deletes nothing. Client has a callback to delete object after request ends. –  umair May 22 '12 at 19:23
    
The callback is not called by the server when processing the request completes then? Very interesting ... I'm just going to jump to the point. You shouldn't have raw pointers in your callback, there should be no need to call delete anywhere, and you need critical sections and wait conditions before using an object whose ownership has passed to an asynchronous call. –  AJG85 May 22 '12 at 19:30
    
callback is called when server responds to HTTP request. Server doesn't even know about user object and is implemented in PHP so it has nothing to do with deletion. I only need a way of knowing whether callback has deleted user or not. –  umair May 22 '12 at 19:41
    
In that case you can use smart pointers as Rob suggested or simply signal from the call back either by setting a flag which must always be checked before calling delete or sending a message to delete handler and always using that mechanism to delete. Smart pointers are cleaner. –  AJG85 May 22 '12 at 19:49

1 Answer 1

Once you've called saveOnServer of a zombie user, the request is the effective "owner" of that user object. Don't free it yourself since there's something else that still intends to use it and delete it later.

In fact, if the server action can return asynchronously, then the user object might get destroyed at any time. You should cease using it entirely from the other code. You've granted control of that object to the request, and you must stop using it from anywhere else:

user = new User();
user->zombie = true; // set *before* transferring ownership to server
user->saveOnServer();
user = NULL;
//some code comes here
user = new User();

If you don't want the request to use that object anymore, then you need to provide some facility for "canceling" the save-on-server action so that it doesn't use the object.


Another option is to use smart pointers. In your main code, store the object in a shared_ptr. In the request object, store it in a weak_ptr. That way, if your main code wants to destroy the user object, it can simply call user.reset(). Then if the callback attempts to use the weak_ptr, it will discover that the pointed-to object is no longer available. When using smart pointers, neither function should use delete. The pointer objects will manage the lifetime of the user for you.

shared_ptr<User> user = make_shared<User>()
user->saveOnServer();
//some code comes here
user.reset(new User());

In the saveOnServer function, use shared_from_this to create a weak_ptr to the object:

void User::saveOnServer(){
  Request *request = new Request();

  //send request on server and register the callback
  weak_ptr<User> self(shared_from_this());
  request ->setCallback(&userCallback, self);
}

In the callback, use that weak_ptr:

void userCallback(weak_ptr<User> data){
  shared_ptr<User) user = data.lock();
  if (!user)
    return;

  //do something here
}
share|improve this answer
    
Problem is that I need to reuse the user pointer for creating new users. I will definitely have a look at smart pointers. thanks –  umair May 22 '12 at 19:21
1  
Then go ahead and reuse it. Nothing I've written here precludes that. You can reuse the variable as much as you want. But if you've transferred ownership of the object, then you mustn't continue using it. I illustrate that in my first code example by assigning user = NULL immediately after calling user->saveOnServer(). Notice that the variable gets re-assigned with user = new User() later, but nothing in between attempts to dereference user because that code doesn't have control over it anymore; it belongs to the request object instead. –  Rob Kennedy May 22 '12 at 19:30
    
Your solution works perfectly if user->zombie = true but if I do not want callback to delete it and set user->zombie = false then callback doesn't delete it and memory gets lost when I create a new user or set it to NULL. Is there anyway of checking if callback has deleted user if not then i check zombie. If false I delete it before creating a new user. –  umair May 22 '12 at 19:38
1  
If the request is to own the user, then set zombie = true and user = NULL. If the request should not own the object, then set zombie = false. But you need to make that decision at the time you call saveOnServer. You can't wait till later because the callback might have already run, so it's too late to grant ownership elsewhere. The bottom line is that you need to be absolutely clear who owns the object. The owner (and only the owner) must destroy it. –  Rob Kennedy May 22 '12 at 19:41
    
ok i get your point. thanks for your help. –  umair May 22 '12 at 19:42

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