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I have a 3500 lines long C function written by someone else that i need to break it apart without causing any regression. Since it is in C, the main problem i face is maintaining the state of the variables. For example if i break a small part of the code into another function, i will need to pass 10 arguments. Some of them will actually change inside the code of the new function. So effectively i will need to pass a pointer to them. It becomes very messy. Is there is better way of dealing with such refactoring? Any "best practice"?

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2  
A 3500 lines long function?? I bet all it does is print "Hello World"... –  K-ballo May 22 '12 at 19:04
    
Use a (pointer to) struct to pack variables by argument. I guess such big function will do a lot of stuff easy to break by "topic" –  Adriano Repetti May 22 '12 at 19:06
    
"written by someone else that i need to break". I feel you .) –  Eimantas May 22 '12 at 19:07
    
Why do you need to break it apart? The original author may have had a good reason for making it one big function. –  bobmcn May 22 '12 at 19:08
3  
"I have a 3500 lines long C function written by someone else that i need to break it apart without causing any regression." : Can you morph into someone else?-) -- If a function isn't written reasonably initially, it can be very hard to rewrite it with better structure. Fairly often you're better off to start with just a description of what it's supposed to do and a blank sheet of paper, and recreate the whole thing from scratch. –  Chuck Kollars May 22 '12 at 19:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unit testing. Extract small portions of the code that depend on 3 variables or less (1 variable best) and test the hell out of it. Replace that code in original function with a call to new function.

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  • Each function should do one thing that is easy to figure out from examining the code.
  • Instead of passing 10 variables around, put them into a structure and pass that around.
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Pack the local variables that are shared between multiple of the sub-functions into a struct and hand the struct around?

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In my opinion, the best thing you can do is to thoroughly study that function, and fully understand its internals. It is more than probable that this function has a lot of anitpatterns inside it, so I'd not try to refactor it: once I knew how it works (which I understand this can suppose a lot of time) I'd throw it away and rewrite the equivalent smaller functions needed, from scratch.

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Are you stuck with C? I have sometimes converted such functions into a C++ class, where I convert the some (or all) local variables into member variables. Once this step has been done, you can easily break out part of the code into methods that work on the member variables.

In practice this means that a function like:

... do_xxx(...)
{
  .. some thousand lines of code...
}

can be converted into:

class xxx_handler
{
public:
  xxx_handler(...);
  ... run(...)
  {
    part1();
    part2();
    part3();
    return ...;
  }
private:
  // Member variables goes here.
};

// New replacement function.
... do_xxx(...)
{
  xxx_handler handler(...);
  return handler.run(...);
}
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C++ does absolutely nothing to help the OP understand the code and determine logical places to break it into smaller functions. And making the locals into class members is probably a step in the wrong direction, only slightly better than turning locals into globals. –  Brian McFarland May 22 '12 at 21:31
1  
@BrianMcFarland, I must disagree! Object orientation is a powerful tool. Most people only use it to model large systems, but it works surprisingly well for small systems, like the ones sometimes written as huge functions. When converting huge functions into the object-oriented format I describe above, it becomes clear which local variables should remain local in smaller functions (e.g. temp variables and loop counters) and which really contain function-global information, which are the ones that are converte to member variables. Your comparison with globals is flawed in a number of ways... –  Lindydancer May 22 '12 at 22:00

One thing to start with, as a first step to taking out parts of the function as independent functions, is to move "function global" temp variables to be in tighter scope, something like:

int temp;

temp = 5;
while(temp > 0) {...}
... 
temp = open(...);
if (temp < 0) {...}

converted to

{
  int temp = 5;
  while(temp > 0) {...}
}
...
{
  int temp = open(...);
  if (temp < 0) {...}
}

After that, it's easier to move each {} block into a separate function, which does one well-defined thing.

But then, most important guideline after having unit tests: Use version control which supports "cherry-picking" (like git). Commit often, basically whenever it compiles after refactoring something, then commit again (or amend the previous commit if you don't want to have the first commit version around) when it actually works. Learn to use version control's diff tool, and cherry-picking, when you need to roll back after breaking something.

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