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Are there any tangible performance penalties for having a large number of variables, properties, and/or methods in a single C# class?

I have several classes (a chess board, move generator, and a PGN parser) that total about 1,200 lines of code. Both the move generator and the parser are very tightly coupled to the board class, and there is a strong temptation to simply combine all three classes into a single large "kitchen sink" class.

I understand and applaud the concept of keeping each class focused on a single task and cleanly encapsulating their internal design, but since using .NET is a non-negotiable requirement, I'm also willing to sacrifice "purity of design" in return for performance

Other than the obvious issues of readability/maintainability, what are the downsides to having a smaller number of large complex classes, as opposed to a larger number of smaller simple classes?

Cheers! Humble Programmer ,,,^..^,,,

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Maintainability and readability aren't enough? As ever, write the clearest code you can to start with - the refactor it so it's even cleaner - then worry about performance, after you've measured it and determined whether or not it's good enough. –  Jon Skeet May 22 '12 at 19:19
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Why does the use of .NET make you think that you should sacrifice good design? –  David May 22 '12 at 19:22
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Really has no relevance to C#, per se, the same answers would be true in most OO programming languages. If your three classes are too strongly coupled, perhaps instead of trying to combine them a better approach would be finding ways to decouple them. –  James Michael Hare May 22 '12 at 19:30
    
"...since using .NET is a non-negotiable requirement, I'm also willing to sacrifice "purity of design" in return for performance." You seem to assume .NET will bring bad performance which is, arguably, false. You'd be better off understanding and embracing a platform's capabilities and using it well. –  Curt Nichols May 22 '12 at 19:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Are there any tangible performance penalties for having a large number of variables, properties, and/or methods in a single C# class?

Having more variables causes instances to have higher memory usage and potentially longer construction times - this can have a penalty if the variables aren't necessarily needed in every circumstance.

That being said, the main disadvantages are more in terms of reliability, maintainability, testability.

I understand and applaud the concept of keeping each class focused on a single task and cleanly encapsulating their internal design, but since using .NET is a non-negotiable requirement, I'm also willing to sacrifice "purity of design" in return for performance

.NET has nothing to do with making horrible code - you can have good design and .NET in the same project, and this is, in fact, quite simple to accomplish.

I have several classes (a chess board, move generator, and a PGN parser) that total about 1,200 lines of code. Both the move generator and the parser are very tightly coupled to the board class, and there is a strong temptation to simply combine all three classes into a single large "kitchen sink" class.

I would consider trying to find the motivation to refactor this and decouple it into more, smaller classes. This is likely to help in every way, including performance (if you find it necessary), as it's typically simpler to fix a performance problem in a clean, well thought-out design than it is to find or fix a performance issue in a tightly coupled, large codebase. Smaller classes are easier to profile and measure, which in turn allows the real performance problems (if any) to be discovered and corrected much more simply than when working from a large mess of code.

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"good design...quite simple to accomplish" Well, "simple" might be pushing it for many people, but it's most certainly possible. I'd say most people need to work at it a bit though. –  Servy May 22 '12 at 19:25
    
@Servy True - but .NET doesn't make it any harder - I'd argue that it's simpler in .NET than many other frameworks, as so many of the required tooling and core classes exist for you already. –  Reed Copsey May 22 '12 at 19:27

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