Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's assume I have a set of objects containing: (relative change, time of change):

(+1,0) (-1, 1) (+1,3) (+1, 3) (-1, 5) (+1, 9)  

Now I want to replace the relative changes by their absolute value, starting at 0:

(1,0) (0, 1) (1,3) (2, 3) (1, 5) (2, 9)
 0+1   0+1-1  0+1-1+1 ...

What is the best way to do this? Is there a Python function that allows me to

  • Iterate over a (ordered) list of objects
  • Internally store an absolute value
  • read the change from each object, update the internal absolute value
  • replace the relative change with the absolute value
share|improve this question
1  
If the values are (a, b) and (c, d), what would your output be? –  robert May 22 '12 at 19:48
2  
@robert - If I understand the question correctly, the output would be [(a, b), (a+c, d)]. –  Andrew Clark May 22 '12 at 19:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is how you can do this with a list comprehension:

>>> data = [(+1,0), (-1, 1), (+1,3), (+1, 3), (-1, 5), (+1, 9)]
>>> [(sum(x[0] for x in data[:i+1]), data[i][1]) for i in range(len(data))]
[(1, 0), (0, 1), (1, 3), (2, 3), (1, 5), (2, 9)]

Or slightly more efficiently (doesn't call sum() for each value):

result = [data[0]]
for change, t in data[1:]:
    result.append((result[-1][0]+change, t))

Since you said these are objects, you will probably need to replace the indexing with an attribute get, for example the x[0] in sum(x[0] for x in data[:i+1]) might become x.change.

share|improve this answer

You can do this with a list comprehension, but this seems more like a job for a generator to me, given the specific terms of your request. This is a very generalized solution that should work with both sequences and iterators. It performs the equivalent of Haskell's scanl function on the iterable passed to it, with an optional initial value as the last argument.

The first argument should be a function that takes two arguments -- the current accumulated state and the next item in the sequence -- and returns the next accumulated state. It could be as simple as operator.add or something more complex.

>>> def scan(f, seq, init=None):
...     seq = iter(seq)
...     state = seq.next() if init is None else init
...     yield state
...     for i in seq:
...         state = f(state, i)
...         yield state

Accumulated summation (i.e. triangular numbers):

>>> import operator
>>> list(scan(operator.add, range(10)))
[0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, 45]

Starting with a different initial value:

>>> list(scan(operator.add, range(1, 10), 10))
[10, 11, 13, 16, 20, 25, 31, 38, 46, 55]

Applied to your problem:

>>> diffs = [(1, 0), (-1, 1), (1, 3), (1, 3), (-1, 5), (1, 9)]
>>> list(scan(lambda x, y: (x[0] + y[0], y[1]), diffs))
[(1, 0), (0, 1), (1, 3), (2, 3), (1, 5), (2, 9)]

With a different initial value, just for the fun of it.

>>> list(scan(lambda x, y: (x[0] + y[0], y[1]), diffs, (5, -1)))
[(5, -1), (6, 0), (5, 1), (6, 3), (7, 3), (6, 5), (7, 9)]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.