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I am looking into the logistics of adding several WPF features to a 1,000,000+ line code-base. I am looking into using databinding and DataTemplates in XAML to easily display various objects. I am able to bind an observable collection: points to a ListBox and if I don't use a template, I can just provided a meaningful toString for the list items and that gets me somewhere. The problem comes in when I want to use a template to display various properties of the list items. It is my understanding that they all have to be DependencyProperties. parent is just a property. It looks like adding dependency properties is fairly complicated. All the classes you want to display have to inherit from DependencyObject and you have to set a bunch of stuff for each property you want to use. This does not seem feasible for a large codebase, to have to do all this for each property. I'm wondering how databinding is used in practice, do you really add crap-tons of dependency properties to all of your classes or is there a better way?

Thanks!

    <ListBox Name="listBox1" 
             ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource points}}">
        <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <StackPanel>
                    <TextBlock Text="Point!"/>
                    <TextBlock Text="{Binding parent}"/>
                </StackPanel>
            </DataTemplate>
        </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    </ListBox>
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You should do something about your acceptance rate. You have 8 questions now and 0 accepted answers –  Fredrik Hedblad May 22 '12 at 19:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem comes in when I want to use a template to display various properties of the list items. It is my understanding that they all have to be DependencyProperties. parent is just a property. It looks like adding dependency properties is fairly complicated. All the classes you want to display have to inherit from DependencyObject and you have to set a bunch of stuff for each property you want to use.

This is not true.

You need to use a Dependency Property or have your type implement INotifyPropertyChanged, but this is only required if you want the binding to work bi-directionally. This requirement exists so that WPF gets notified when a property value changes, and the UI can update automatically. However, if the property value isn't changing while the screen is displayed, there is no requirement (other than the value be a Property, and not a Field).

If you're just displaying the values within the object, and they won't change while being displayed, standard properties will work fine.

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Ok, that's good. So the above code produces a textblock that says Point! and a textblock that is empty so something isn't working. parent is declared like this: private String parent { get; set; } and the points has two items in it before InitializeComponent() is called. –  markv12 May 22 '12 at 19:57
    
@markv12 You probably need to set the DataContext of the window/page/usercontrol - That may be as simple as adding, right after InitializeComponent(); this.DataContext = this; The DataContext is where the binding system "looks for" the property... –  Reed Copsey May 22 '12 at 19:58
    
Ok, that didn't work, I think the issue is that I want the parent property of each item in the list, so the DataContext needs to change. The binding system needs to look in a different place each time. Path="parent" also doesn't work. –  markv12 May 22 '12 at 20:10

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