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Lets say I have an enumerable source, that looks like this:

IEnumerable<string> source = new [] { "first", "first", "first", "second" };

I want to be able to construct a LINQ statement that will return this:

"first", "first", "second"

Notice how only one of the firsts is gone. I don't care which one, because in my case all 3 "first"s are considered equal. I've tried source.Except(new [] { "first" }) but that strips all instances out.

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2  
Just to be clear, you want to remove duplicates, but only one instance of that duplicate? –  Pheonixblade9 May 22 '12 at 21:00
    
Yep, that's the case. So far, I've only found things that will remove everything. I'd like to keep this on IEnumerable<T> without having to use yield return if possible. –  insta May 22 '12 at 21:02
    
Distinct() method will remove duplicates for you. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb348436.aspx –  Adam May 22 '12 at 21:05
2  
I have trouble thinking of a use case for such an operator. You need to do this a lot? –  user180326 May 22 '12 at 21:17
1  
@insta Well sometimes on this site, when questions appear contrived, the bigger picture may help to suggest alternative solutions. –  user180326 May 23 '12 at 14:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted
source
  .GroupBy(s => s)
  .SelectMany(g => g.Skip(1).DefaultIfEmpty(g.First()))

For each group, skip the first element of the group and return the rest - unless that would return none... in that case, return the first element of the group.


source
  .GroupBy(s => s)
  .SelectMany(g => g.Take(1).Concat(g.Skip(2)))

For each group, take the first element, and take from the third element on - always skipping the second element.

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2  
g.Single will raise exception. Replace with g.First() and this will be perfectly elegant (Invalid operation exception : sequence contains more than one element) –  Raphaël Althaus May 22 '12 at 21:12
1  
or var res = source .GroupBy(s => s) .SelectMany(g => (g.Count() > 1) ? g.Skip(1) : g).ToList(); –  Raphaël Althaus May 22 '12 at 21:18
    
You could also wrap g.Single() in a Lazy so as to not evaluate it if it's not needed, and to avoid the problem that @RaphaëlAlthaus Mentioned. –  Servy May 22 '12 at 21:18
    
Yes yes, thanks for the catch and the edit - all. –  David B May 23 '12 at 1:02
    
I like this one a lot. –  insta May 23 '12 at 13:45

I think David B's answer get's you really close, but it will not remove the value in the case where there's only one value there, which is what I think the original poster was looking for.

Here's an extension method that will remove a single instance of the requested item, even if that's the last instance. This mirrors the LINQ Except() call, but only removes the first instance, not all instances.

    public static IEnumerable<T> ExceptSingle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T valueToRemove)
    {
        return source
            .GroupBy(s => s)
            .SelectMany(g => g.Key.Equals(valueToRemove) ? g.Skip(1) : g);
    }

Given: {"one", "two", "three", "three", "three"}
The call source.ExceptSingle("three") results in {"one", "two", "three", "three"}

Given: {"one", "two", "three", "three"}
The call source.ExceptSingle("three") results in {"one", "two", "three"}

Given: {"one", "two", "three"}
The call source.ExceptSingle("three") results in {"one", "two"}

Given: {"one", "two", "three", "three"}
The call source.ExceptSingle("four") results in {"one", "two", "three", "three"}

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This does indeed do exactly what I want. I ended up using the version I posted as another answer to myself. Still, have a +1. –  insta Aug 15 '12 at 21:44

I figured out a one-liner LINQ statement to do it. It requires a separate flag variable. I implemented it as an extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> ExceptOne<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, T element)
{
    var i = 0;

    return enumerable.Where(original => !EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(original, element) || ++i > 1);
}

I used an int in case I later want to add a "numberToRemove" parameter (change the > 1 to > numberToRemove). YAGNI and all that, but it was about as readable as a boolean would have been anyway.

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I'm not super familiar with LINQ, but here's the general flow you might want to use for this:

Store all unique items in a new list B i.e.:

A: {1, 1, 1, 2, 4, 4, 6}

becomes

B: {1, 2, 4, 6}

Iterate through B, removing an instance of it in A if it exists i.e.:

A: {1, 1, 1, 2, 4, 4, 6}

becomes

F: {1, 1, 2, 4, 6}

Hope this helps!

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IEnumerable<string> source = new [] { "first", "first", "first", "second" };

List<string> newSource = new List<string>();

var foo = source.GroupBy (s => s).Select (s => new KeyValuePair<string,int>(s.Key, (s.Count()>1)?s.Count()-1:s.Count ()));

foreach (var element in foo)
{
    newSource.AddRange(Enumerable.Repeat(element.Key,element.Value));
}

Very quick effort here. Basically, this will create a second list from the original with each distinct key and a count of instances, deduct one if there is more than one, then re-render a list with the right number of elements.

Not as elegant as David B's answer but I'd already written so though I may as well post it as another possible answer. I'm sure the foreach can be made in to a Linq statement but it's late and my brain isn't working!

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