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I'm using a form and jQuery to make a quick change on a web site. I would like to change the button text to 'Saved!' then change it back to Update after a few seconds so the user can change the value again. Of course they can hit the now 'Saved!' button again, but it doesn't look nice.

$("form.stock").submit(function(){
    // Example Post
    $.post($(this).attr('action'), { id: '123', stock: '1' });
    $(this).find(":submit").attr('value','Saved!');
    // This doesn't work, but is what I would like to do
    setTimeout($(this).find(":submit").attr('value','Update'), 2000);
    return false;
});
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5 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

First argument to setTimeout is function. So wrap your code inside an anonymous function and you are good to go.

$("form.stock").submit(function(){
    // Example Post
    $.post($(this).attr('action'), { id: '123', stock: '1' });
    var submit = $(this).find(":submit").attr('value','Saved!'); //Creating closure for setTimeout function. 
    setTimeout(function() { $(submit).attr('value','Update') }, 2000);
    return false;
});

I am not able to test this code right now. Let me know if it doesn't work.

EDIT: As suggested by redsquare, it makes sense to create closure from the submit button itself.

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Thank you for pointing out the obvious! :) –  Chris Bartow Jul 1 '09 at 20:01
1  
no need to run the submit selector twice, you can put that in a var to use within the setTimeout –  redsquare Jul 1 '09 at 20:02
    
Agreed, modified the code to reflect this approach. –  SolutionYogi Jul 1 '09 at 20:06
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If it's actually a "button" tag then to change it you would use.

$('#button_id').html('New Text');

Of course if you're preforming this onClick for that button then you could easily just pass (this) into the function as an object and $(this).html('New Text'); instead.

Hope this helps someone.

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I would suggest, perhaps, a different (in my opinion better) interface to give feedback than changing the text of the button. You could use jGrowl or the dialog widget to display a message via a callback from the post method.

$("form.stock").submit(function(){
    $.post(
        $(this).attr('action'),
        { id: '123', stock: '1' },
        function() { $.jGrowl("Your update was successfully saved."); }
    );
});
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+1 for talking usability (feedback) –  karim79 Jul 1 '09 at 20:12
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You probably want to wrap the action in a function:

setTimeout(function(){$(this).find(":submit").attr('value', 'Update')}, 2000);
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I think 'this' inside the setTimeout anonymous function won't work correctly. One needs to use closure to capture 'this'. –  SolutionYogi Jul 1 '09 at 20:00
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$("form.stock").submit(function(){
    var $form = $(this);
    $.post( $form.attr('action'), { id: '123', stock: '1' } );
    var $submit = $form.find(":submit").attr('value','Saved!');
    window.setTimeout(function() {
         $submit.attr('value','Update') 
    }, 2000);
    return false;
});
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