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There are 2 SQL tables:

Table1
    ID | field1
    1  | a
    2  | b

Table2
        field1 | field2
        a      | 111
        a      | 222
        b      | 333
        b      | 444
        b      | 555

I need to get the following Table3:

ID | field1 | field2
1  | a      | 111
1  | a      | 222
2  | b      | 333
2  | b      | 444
2  | b      | 555

I tired to run such SQL query:

SELECT t1.ID, t1.field1, t2.field2 FROM table1 t1, table2 t2 WHERE t1.field1=t2.field1;

but as a result I received duplicated entries, sth like this

ID | field1 | field2
1  | a      | 111
1  | a      | 111
2  | a      | 222
2  | a      | 222

etc.

Please help.

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closed as not a real question by Jack Maney, Burkhard, ypercube, JoseK, ChrisF May 23 '12 at 11:09

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What have you tried? Pick up a book on SQL. Look at some documentation. –  Jack Maney May 22 '12 at 21:23
    
What database and version are you using? –  Mark Byers May 22 '12 at 21:29
1  
So does GROUP BY : sqlfiddle.com/#!2/76afc/3 –  ilanco May 22 '12 at 21:34
1  
@RedFilter: For what it's worth, I haven't downvoted any answers on this post, so please don't take it personally. I just feel that the OP didn't get a complete answer and the answers posted here (at the time I posted) acted like this is normal behaviour and that adding a DISTINCT is what any database professional would do in this situation, and that no alarm bells should be ringing. I think he needed a second diagnosis and that's why I posted my answer. –  Mark Byers May 22 '12 at 22:01
1  
I agree with @Mark on this. @RedFilter you are making the opposite assumptions. I feel that if you had added those assumptions in your answer, you wouldn't had been dowvoted in the first place. 4 answers, all suggesting DISTINCT in a seemingly blind way, without any other advice or consideration, is probably the cause of the downvotes. –  ypercube May 22 '12 at 22:12

5 Answers 5

Your approach (although your SQL is ugly and hard to read) should work.

See it working online: sqlfiddle

Your problem is that there are duplicates in one of your input tables. Try SELECT * FROM Table1 or SELECT * FROM Table2and you'll probably see something like this:

ID | field1
1  | a
2  | b
1  | a
2  | b

I suggest:

  • Removing the duplicate rows from the table.
  • Adding a unique index on your ID field to prevent it happening again.
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2  
Yes, that would explain why DISTINCT is required. OP's example doesn't require DISTINCT. –  zmbq May 22 '12 at 21:34

(I am assuming your sample data is not representative of your issue, since it will result in no duplicates.)

You can use the DISTINCT keyword to eliminate duplicates, like this:

select distinct t1.ID,
    t1.field1,
    t2.field2
from table1 t1
inner join table2 t2 on t1.field1 = t2.field1;

Sample SQL Fiddle to illustrate the problem here: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/ed198/1

Solution illustrated here: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/ed198/2

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3  
Why would you need DISTINCT here? –  zmbq May 22 '12 at 21:24
    
@zmbq Because DISTINCT eliminates duplicate rows, which is the problem the OP is having. –  RedFilter May 22 '12 at 21:29
2  
@RedFilter I don't understand why all of them were downvoted. –  bluefeet May 22 '12 at 21:31
1  
I know what 'DISTINCT' does, I just don't understand why it's necessary in this case. Why would that JOIN result in duplicate rows? –  zmbq May 22 '12 at 21:33
1  
@zmbq - I think you are making an assumption that the sample data provided is correct to indicate the problem. That is often not the case on SO :) I am taking the OP at their word when they say they are getting duplicate rows, and assuming they have not given good sample data. –  RedFilter May 22 '12 at 21:36

Use GROUP BY to remove duplicates from your result.

SELECT t1.ID, t1.field1, t2.field2
FROM table1 t1, table2 t2
WHERE t1.field1=t2.field1
GROUP BY t1.ID, t1.field1, t2.field2;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1: this works, too –  RedFilter May 22 '12 at 21:44
    
Even if we agree that the "DISTINCT" approach is the correct answer to this question (I'm not sure it is, but let's just say it is for sake of argument), using GROUP BY to achieve it instead of just using DISTINCT is not a good approach IMHO. I didn't downvote this answer, but there's no reason to upvote it when better answers have been posted. –  Mark Byers May 22 '12 at 21:51
2  
@MarkByers I don't base my votes on your opinion, but rather, mine, which is: this is a valid, correct answer that was needlessly voted down. I voted it up to compensate for the downvote it received. –  RedFilter May 22 '12 at 22:00

try using DISTINCT to get your results, also I would advise using JOIN syntax for your tables and not commas between the table names.

SELECT DISTINCT t1.ID, t1.field1, t2.field2 
FROM table1 t1
INNER JOIN table2 t2 
    ON t1.field1=t2.field1;
share|improve this answer

You are going to have to throw a SELECT DISTINCT at the front of that query. SELECT DISTINCT t1.ID, t1.field1, t2.field2 FROM table1 t1, table2 t2 WHERE t1.field1=t2.field1;

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1  
I don't know why your answer is downvoted, but it does the right job for me. –  Klausos Klausos May 22 '12 at 21:30

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