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How to match different instances of the same word.

Eg: if the string is synergy. How to match it with synergizes, synergism, synergically, synergistic. I could write the following:

    while(<IN>)
 {
chomp $_;
my $line= $_;
$word="Synergy";
if($line=~m/$word(\w+)/i)
{
     $line=~s/$word/<Effect>$word<\/Effect>/ig;
}
 }
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1  
Seems like you will need a big database of what words share the same root as other words. I'm not aware of any algorithm that can correctly derive the root of a word in all cases, therefore I don't think there is a solution to this problem that can be achieved only by writing code. –  cdhowie May 22 '12 at 21:43

3 Answers 3

What you probably want to do is called stemming. However, for this to work, you have to stem all the words in the text plus the one you search for. Hopefully all of your listed words result in the same stem. I haven't tested it yet.

use Lingua::Stem;
my $stemmer = Lingua::Stem->new( -locale => 'EN-UK' );

# first convert text to list of words
my @words;
while(<IN>) {
    push @words, split(/\b/, $_); # you can do better here
}
# now stem all words.
my $stemmed_words = $stemmer->stem(@words);
# results in an array ref of stems in the same order as the words have been.

# now stem your search
my $stemmed_search = $stemmer->stem($word);

# and do the search from above inside stemmed array.

Now it depends on what you want. If you want to exchange all those words with something, you have to get the indexes of the matched (stemmed) words and do the replacement at the same positions inside your text.

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You're going to want to use regular expressions. It is unclear what exactly the criteria you want to match, but in your example all the words start with "synergi" so if($string =~ \bsynergi\w*\b) would find all lines containing "synergi" anywhere in them.

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Thanks, Can u please check the above edited code... I am trying to substitute words like synergy, synergism, synergistically, synergize with the above tags –  Mary May 22 '12 at 21:59

You might want to check out Text::Soundex. For example,

use Text::Soundex;

# The following all return S562
print soundex("synergizes"), "\n";
print soundex("synergism"), "\n";
print soundex("synergically"), "\n";
print soundex("synergistic"), "\n";

Further reading: Perldoc Text::Soundex

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1  
alternatively you could use metaphone, which handles different languages better than soundex, but is also less fuzzy. for example the lib for perl: search.cpan.org/dist/Text-DoubleMetaphone –  devsnd May 22 '12 at 21:55
    
I have edited the above code, what If I have to substitute Words close to synergy with the above tags. –  Mary May 22 '12 at 21:57
    
I would think you'd need a dictionary of words in a database table with a word column and a soundex column (or two if using the double metaphone, which might work better). This would allow a self-join query on the soundex column to get a list of similar words. –  John Dewey May 22 '12 at 22:10
    
Note that the soundex and metaphone algorithms match words up very broadly, so you'd get a lot of false positives from them. e.g., "simmers" would also be encoded by soundex as S562 despite being completely unrelated to "synergy". –  Dave Sherohman May 23 '12 at 13:26

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