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I have this html:

<div id='calendarControlPane'>          
    <div id='calendarControl'>

        <div style="border-style:solid; display:inline-block;">
            <div style="width:14;height:15;">
            </div>
        </div>

        <div style="border-style:solid; display:inline-block;">
            <div style="width:14;height:15;">
            </div>
        </div>

        <div style="border-style:solid; display:inline-block;">
            <div style="width:14;height:15;">
            </div>
        </div>

    </div>      
</div>

I'm using "display:inline-block" on container divs because I want those divs to fit the size of their contents.

The problem I have is that they are drawn next to each other and need to be drawn below each other.

share|improve this question
2  
As an addition: You should add a value-unit for width and height, such as px, em or % –  drublic May 22 '12 at 22:11
    
@Jaime Rivera - I edited your post so that the HTML formatting is cleaner. Sometimes when you cut and paste into a Stackoverflow question, the formatting gets corrupted. Its important to fix this because it is easier for people to read. Considering that people are already going out of their way to help you for free, it is rude to post code with bad formatting. I would also suggest having posted a screen shot of your issue instead if simply saying "they are drawn next to each other." It is much easier for people to understand what you mean from a picture. –  Chris Dutrow May 23 '12 at 15:07
    
@Jaime Rivera - I also suggest upvoting all answers save a very small minority that are blatantly incorrect. Do this as a thank-you to people for taking their time to help you. –  Chris Dutrow May 23 '12 at 15:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, depending upon your actual final application, using a float can work (see fiddle), though older versions of IE can choke on it:

HTML

<div id="calendarControlPane">          
   <div id="calendarControl">
    <div>
        <div></div>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div></div>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div></div>
    </div>
   </div>
</div>

CSS

#calendarControl > div {
    float: left;
    clear: left;
    border: 1px solid black;
}

#calendarControl > div > div {
    width: 14px;
    height: 15px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is fine in IE7, so there's probably no need to include the warning so prominently. –  thirtydot May 22 '12 at 22:26
    
thanks @ScottS, it work perfectly, i tried with float:left but looks like clear:left was missing –  Jaime Rivera May 22 '12 at 22:34
    
@thirtydot--this simple case may be okay, but I don't really know what else he may have going on in his page. I just know there are numerous points to consider depending on the actual page layout. The link I posted, and then another accessed from the same page with more issues. Since I don't know the entirety of his markup or intentions, I just wanted to be sure he was aware of the situation (if he cared about IE7). –  ScottS May 22 '12 at 22:38

You're not really asking a question here, and the two bottom lines of your post are a bit hard to understand, but are you sure you don't want display: block instead?

edit: As drublic said, this is the default display value for divs, so you shouldn't need that style at all.

share|improve this answer
    
The div-element has display: block applied by default to it. @Jaime Rivera, you should delete the display: inline-property. –  drublic May 22 '12 at 22:13
    
If I delete the 'display: block-inline' property the container div don't fit the size of its contents. If there is another way to do this, I could change it. –  Jaime Rivera May 22 '12 at 22:21
    
The problem is, he wants the outer div to shrink wrap the content, or as he stated, "fit the size of their contents." A div is display: block by default, but it is also a width of 100% of the screen by default as well. –  ScottS May 22 '12 at 22:23
    
Ah. You could cange the width of the outter div to the sum of the width of the inner ones. Or just use float solution provided in the other answer. Float solutions tend to be messy though. –  Daniero May 22 '12 at 22:27

Oldschool fix:

<div id='calendarControlPane'">          
    <div id='calendarControl'">
        <div style="border-style:solid; display:inline-block;">
            <div style="width:14;height:15;"></div>
        </div><br />
        <div style="border-style:solid; display:inline-block;">
            <div style="width:14;height:15;"></div>
        </div><br />
        <div style="border-style:solid; display:inline-block;">
            <div style="width:14;height:15;"></div>
        </div>


    </div>

</div>​

Simply add a

<br />

after each div containing the inline-block class.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, it does work, but it's horrible for obvious reasons. –  thirtydot May 22 '12 at 22:28
    
I did say "oldschool" fix ;) –  Ilya Karnaukhov May 22 '12 at 22:31

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