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I am using Python to read a file of the following format:

iter1
iter2
iter3
[n lines of stuff]
FLAG = value

iter1
iter2
iter3
iter4
iter5
[n lines of stuff]
FLAG = value
etc....

I want to to search for FLAG, read that value, and then rewind back by 'n' lines and read the value of the final iteration. Note that there are not always the same number of iterations. The number of lines 'n' is consistent within each file; however, these lines may contain different numbers of bytes so I am having trouble using the seek feature.

I would like to do something like this:

f = open(file)  
for i in f:  
    a = re.search('FLAG')  
    if a:  
          print a  
          spot=f.tell() #mark original spot  
          f.seek(-n,1)  #rewind by n lines  
          b = re.search('iter')  
          print b  
          f.seek(spot) #return to FLAG line, continue to next data set  
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1  
Can you read the entire file into memory or is it too large? –  Mark Byers May 22 '12 at 22:25
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming your "n lines of stuff" don't contain any lines starting with "iter", you're making the problem much harder than it is. All you need to do is keep track of the last line you saw that started with "iter". Then when you see "FLAG=" you have that data already; no need to "rewind" and look for it.

lastiterline = None
with open(filename) as f:
    for line in f:
        line = line.strip()
        if line.startswith("iter"):
           lastiterline = line
        elif line.startswith("FLAG"):
           if lastiterline:
               print line
               print lastiterline
           lastiterline = None

In general, it is simplest to read a file once and remember the bits you'll need later as they go by.

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I thought he as to go back n lines and not only one. –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke May 22 '12 at 22:49
    
It doesn't matter how many lines he has to go back. He wants the last iter line, i.e., the one before the [n lines of stuff] (iter3 in his first data set and iter5 in the second). –  kindall May 22 '12 at 22:51
    
Hach. I did not even read your snippet properly. Excuse me. –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke May 23 '12 at 8:16
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For such problems in general, you could read and process the file block-wise:

def flagblocks(filename):
    with open(filename) as f:
        yieldlist = []
        for line in f:
            if not line.strip():
                continue
            if not line.startswith("FLAG"):
                yieldlist.append(line)
                continue
            yield yieldlist
            yieldlist = []
         yield yieldlist


for flagblock in flagblocks("filename"):
    process_flagblock_lines(flagblock)

The processing function in your special case would still do basically the same as kindall suggested.

The logic in the flagblocks function may not be optimal or even buggy.

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