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I need to store 150 different tiny integer values (range from 0 to 7) into a MySQL database table row. All of those would be read and written to together every time there's an SELECT, INSERT or UPDATE. The table would mostly be updated, there would be 1 insert, and then about 1000 updates on the row. DELETES and SELECTS would happen really rarely, if ever.

Performance wise, is it better to use 150 tinyint columns, or a varchar(300)?

My main concern it the time it takes MySQL to process 150 column definitions when result set is prepared vs double-size that would require double RAM if cached. I expect to have hundreds of thousands of rows, so each bit of performance counts.

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You could pack your 150 integers into 50 bytes (stored in a BINARY(50) type) and bit twiddle your way to your desired data; or even store them in 1 byte per integer as BINARY(150)? –  eggyal May 22 '12 at 23:12
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lets assume that it is more efficient (in time and space) to store them in one big field. What makes you think you won't lose that gain (or more) when you unpack the data in your code? –  Toote May 22 '12 at 23:23
    
I did this but I 2000 to store. All depends on where you need to access them individually. My code only unpacked and packed in one place, then used them to build a scatter plot. Some sort of serialisation of an array or list of the type you use in the application (byte?) would be better than characters unless it is character data as in ascii 48 to 54. –  Tony Hopkinson May 22 '12 at 23:33
    
This could easily work because the database has more overhead decoding the row and processing it than the client has decoding the "string". –  usr May 22 '12 at 23:36
    
@Toote: I need to store hundreds of thousands rows, but application would only work with a few hundred rows at a time. –  Milan Babuškov May 23 '12 at 5:25

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd store them in a BINARY column, one per byte. The dataset should easily fit in memory, 150b*500k = 75Mb. I don't think the overhead of postprocessing a byte array would be more than the db overhead of working with the columns for queries and selects. INSERTs and UPDATEs will take parsing time from the DB, along with being ugly to construct. The difference is probably in the millisecond range though, so I'd do what makes sense for decoding on your application end.

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All fields are read/updated together. Obviously, I would use string concatenation to build the UPDATE statement. –  Milan Babuškov May 23 '12 at 5:29
    
I can't imagine the overhead of postprocessing a byte array to be more than the db overhead of working with the columns for queries and selects. Maybe SELECT * FROM is efficient, but INSERT and UPDATE will take parsing time from the DB, along with being ugly to construct. The difference is probably in the millisecond range though, so I'd do what makes sense for decoding on your application end. How are the fields stored there? And, the dataset should easily fit in memory, 150b*500k = 75Mb. –  Joshua Martell May 23 '12 at 13:21
    
My system is mostly updates. The parsing of UPDATE statements with 150 fields could be very slow, so you're right, binary is the way to go. This is exactly what I was looking for. Could you please post your comment as a real answer, so that I can accept it. –  Milan Babuškov May 24 '12 at 21:28
    
I've included the the comment discussion points in my answer above. –  Joshua Martell May 25 '12 at 2:19
    
Oh, I completely missed the fact that this was your answer as well. Sorry. –  Milan Babuškov May 25 '12 at 12:40

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