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I need a ReadWriteLock that is NOT reentrant, because the lock may be released by a different thread than the one that acquired it. (I realized this when I started to get IllegalMonitorStateException intermittently.)

I'm not sure if non-reentrant is the right term. A ReentrantLock allows the thread that currently holds to lock to acquire it again. I do NOT want this behaviour, therefore I'm calling it "non-reentrant".

The context is that I have a socket server using a thread pool. There is NOT a thread per connection. Requests may get handled by different threads. A client connection may need to lock in one request and unlock in another request. Since the requests may be handled by different threads, I need to be able to lock and unlock in different threads.

Assume for the sake of this question that I need to stay with this configuration and that I do really need to lock and unlock in different requests and therefore possibly different threads.

It's a ReadWriteLock because I need to allow multiple "readers" OR an exclusive "writer".

It looks like this could be written using AbstractQueuedSynchronizer but I'm afraid if I write it myself I'll make some subtle mistake. I can find various examples of using AbstractQueuedSynchronizer but not a ReadWriteLock.

I could take the OpenJDK ReentrantReadWriteLock source and try to remove the reentrant part but again I'm afraid I wouldn't get it quite right.

I've looked in Guava and Apache Commons but didn't find anything suitable. Apache Commons has RWLockManager which might do what I need but I'm not sure and it seems more complex than I need.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A Semaphore allows different threads to perform the acquire and release of permits. An exclusive write is equivalent to having all of the permits, as the thread waits until all have been released and no additional permits can be acquired by other threads.

final int PERMITS = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
Semaphore semaphore = new Semaphore(PERMITS);

// read
semaphore.acquire(1);
try { ... }
finally {
  semaphore.release(1);
}

// write
semaphore.acquire(PERMITS);
try { ... }
finally {
  semaphore.release(PERMITS);
}
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Thanks, that sounds like it might do the trick. Reading the docs for Semaphore it sounds like I'd need to specify the "fair" option. "This class also provides convenience methods to acquire and release multiple permits at a time. Beware of the increased risk of indefinite postponement when these methods are used without fairness set true." –  Andrew McKinlay May 23 '12 at 2:09
    
And I see that Semaphore is implemented (at least in OpenJDK) with AbstractQueuedSynchronizer –  Andrew McKinlay May 23 '12 at 2:19

I'm not sure I'm understanding the question. A non-reentrant ReadWriteLock is an oxymoron IMO give that the word "reentrant" has specific meaning in the threading vernacular. It must be usable from multiple threads otherwise it wouldn't work. There is only the ReentrantReadWriteLock that implements ReadWriteLock in the Java 6 JDK that I can see. Certainly multiple reads can lock a ReadWriteLock at the same time but to use the word "reentrant" in this context is confusing.

What you should be doing is having good code patterns of locking and unlocking. For example, always use try {} finally blocks to make sure you get each unlock.

ReadWriteLock readWriteLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
Lock readLock = readWriteLock.readLock();
...
readLock.lock();
try {
    ... // do stuff with the data
} finally {
    readLock.unlock();
}

The implication that one thread would lock() and another unlock() is not the way you should be using the ReadWriteLock. That a very bad pattern.

looks like this could be written using AbstractQueuedSynchronizer

But that would suffer from the same problems that you are having now. If you are not using it appropriately you will still get threads accessing your protected Collection outside of the lock.

I started to get IllegalMonitorStateException intermittently

I'm would not be quick to blame your ReadWriteLock for this. I suspect rather that you have some code that is not locking a collection or that you are modifying a collection in a read-lock by accident.

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3  
Great answer. If your locks are being unlocked on a different thread, you're not applying them correctly. –  derekerdmann May 22 '12 at 23:29
    
Non-reentrant may be the wrong term. A ReentrantLock allows the thread that currently holds to lock to acquire it again. I do NOT want this behaviour, therefore I called it "non-reentrant". The context is that I have a socket server using multiple a thread pool. There is NOT a thread per connection. Requests may get handled by different threads. A client connection may need to lock in one request and unlock in another request. Since the requests may be handled by different threads, I need to be able to lock and unlock in different threads. –  Andrew McKinlay May 22 '12 at 23:37
1  
That seems overly complex @Andrew. You might consider doing one thread per connection unless you plan on having 10,00s of simultaneous connections. If you must stay with your current config then I'd lock around a single client transaction. I would not hold a read lock and then have the next client trxn handled by the next thread unlock it. Without knowing more about your program it's hard to help further unfortunately. –  Gray May 22 '12 at 23:45
    
Assume for the sake of this question that I need to stay with the current configuration and that I do really need to lock and unlock in different requests and therefore possibly different threads. –  Andrew McKinlay May 22 '12 at 23:54
    
A client connection may need to lock in one request and unlock in another request So what you're saying is you want to be DDoSed –  Falmarri May 23 '12 at 0:10

Not entirely sure what you need, esp. why it should be a read write lock, but if you have task that need to be handled by many threads, and you don't want it to be processesd/accessed concurrently, I'd use actually a ConcurrentMap ( etc.).

You can remove the task from the map or substitute it with a special "lock object" to indicate it's locked. You could return the task with an updated state to the map to let another thread take over, or alternatively you can pass the task directly to the next thread and let it return the task to the map instead.

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So you are recommending that I implement my own ReadWriteLock using something like ConcurrentMap? I'm not sure that would be easier/better than using AbstractQueuedSynchronizer. I'd have to implement waiting and queuing myself. –  Andrew McKinlay May 22 '12 at 23:58
    
@AndrewMcKinlay: No, I'm implying that you may not need a ReadWriteLock. If all you want is processing some task using multiple threads that perform some different work on the task, then my suggestion is one way of doing it. In general you use ReadWriteLock to get performance gain when there are many readers compared to writers. In fact it is conceivable to put a ReadWriteLock in my suggested implementation (instead of locking the object away as described in my answer), but that's an optimization and is not fundamental. –  Enno Shioji May 23 '12 at 1:36
    
I need/want multiple readers / single writer as a ReadWriteLock supports. –  Andrew McKinlay May 23 '12 at 1:50
    
@AndrewMcKinlay: Hm. You can't really need a ReadWriteLock because it is possible to read with a write lock... right? Using a read write lock over a regular lock is always an optimization. A binary Semaphore (semaphore with one permission) could be what you are looking for. That way you can release the lock from a different thread. –  Enno Shioji May 23 '12 at 2:31

I know you've already accepted another answer. But I still think that you are going to create quite a nightmare for yourself. Eventually, a client is going to fail to come back and release those permits and you'll begin to wonder why the "writer" never writes.

If I were doing it, I would do it like this:

Client issues a request to start a transaction
The initial request creates a task (Runnable/Callable) and places it in an Executor for execution
The initial request also registers that task in a Map by transaction id

Client issues the second request to close the transaction
The close request finds the task by transaction id in a map
The close request calls a method on the task to indicate that it should close (probably a signal on a Condition or if data needs to be passed, placing an object in a BlockingQueue)

Now, the transaction task would have code like this:

public void run() {
    readWriteLock.readLock().lock();
    try {
        //do stuff for initializing this transaction
        if (condition.await(someDurationAsLong, someTimeUnit)( {
            //do the rest of the transaction stuff
        } else {
            //do some other stuff to back out the transaction
        }
    } finally {
        readWriteLock.readLock.unlock();
    }
}
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Thanks for your concern, I appreciate the feedback. Your approach is interesting. However, it would require a thread per transaction, and since a connection could have multiple transactions, that's even more threads than thread-per-connection. I have thought about and taken steps to handle these kinds of issues - both connections and transactions are tracked and timed out if they are idle for too long. –  Andrew McKinlay May 24 '12 at 2:20
    
The software I'm working on is in production in 100's of installations and I've seen the kind of abuse that you're warning me about and I am well aware it has to be defended against. Don't get me wrong, I'm not a newbie, but I'm also far from perfect. I'm sure some of my design decisions aren't optimal. If you're interested you can see more of what I'm up to on my blog - thesoftwarelife.blogspot.ca –  Andrew McKinlay May 24 '12 at 2:20
    
Don't get me wrong, I don't question your skill or intellect, I think you sound quite capable and articulate actually. If it's a huge system intended to handle large numbers of concurrent transactions then yes, the JVM may be pressed for the extra memory to create stack space for all the threads (assuming you have an unbounded thread pool). With a bounded thread pool, your executor limits the number concurrent transactions. This of course would not be too unusual, as some services take these types of things as parameters. Bound the pool and RejectedExecutionException stops new transactions. –  Tim Bender May 25 '12 at 23:23
    
Thread per a transaction is probably not a great design pattern anyway. –  Tim Bender May 25 '12 at 23:25

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