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I searched Google to no avail. Anyone here who can show me how to code up term frequency in Prolog? The more "logic" the better. Given a text file, ignore non alphanumeric characters, detect words, remove stop words (possibly given in an external file), count the occurrences of each word in the file and output something like "word : freq" ordered by decreasing frequency.

Thanks!

(this is not homework, btw, this is a project I'm doing)

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This is overly broad for a SO question. What have you tried so far? What problems are you facing? –  mgibsonbr May 22 '12 at 23:31
    
Prolog is not my language style of choice. I am looking for a "expert prologer" to show me how to think of this problem in logic programming style. –  E-Mumble May 22 '12 at 23:39
    
This problem is a bad fit for logic programming IMHO. Even when implemented in Prolog, it's structure would be very similar to an imperative program. I'd suggest trying to implement it the best way you can, then submitting it for peer review in codereview.SE so people can suggest more "logic" ways to improve it. –  mgibsonbr May 22 '12 at 23:46
    
Thank you for your opinion mgibsonbr. The question is not "Is this a good problem for logic programming?" It's "how do you do this in prolog?" It's not just about making it work -- this is not homework, and I don't have to ship code tomorrow. It's about how to express it in logic. People who have experience in Prolog can do it much better than I ever could. Hopefully, some prolog experts will read this. –  E-Mumble May 23 '12 at 4:37
    
Still, the question is a bit too broad. I've contributed with an answer to the stop words problem, and for the parsing of the text (i.e. recognizing words in a free text) I leave this link as a sugestion, I hope it helps! –  mgibsonbr May 23 '12 at 5:43

3 Answers 3

Here's something to get you started:

It assumes the words are each on a separate line of input file

Does not handle "stop words"

Does not implement sort

; Print the term frequency for words in file Path
print_freq_from_file(Path) :-
    open( Path, read, Stream ),
    read_file( Stream, Words ),
    calc_freq( Words, Freq ),
    sort_freq( Freq, SortedFreq ),
    print_freq( SortedFreq ).

; calc_freq(Words,Freq) Freq is the term frequency of the words in list Words
calc_freq( [], [] ).
calc_freq( [Word|Words], Freq ) :-
    calc_freq( Words, FreqRest ),
    add_word( Word, FreqRest, Freq ).

; add_word( Word, Freq1, Freq2 ) Freq2 is Freq1 with Word added
add_word( Word, [], [(Word,1)] ).
add_word( Word, [(Word,N)|Rest], [(Word,N1)|Rest] ) :-
    N1 is N+1.
add_word( Word, [Term|Rest], [Term|NewRest] ) :-
    add_word( Word, Rest, NewRest ).

; Print the given term frequency
print_freq( [] ).
print_freq( [(W,N)|Rest] ) :-
    write( W ), write( ' : ' ), write( N ), nl,
    print_freq( Rest ).
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Thanks! I assume read_file is the same as read, yes? In any case, one of the parts of this problem that I want to see is the logic for expressing the splitting of a line into words; also the logic for expressing the filtering of non alphanums; and the logic for filtering stop words. I expect a lot of that to be expressed as basic facts, for example stop_word(the). Is that how you would do it? –  E-Mumble May 23 '12 at 4:24

I use SWI-Prolog extensive library support in this answer, so could be inappropriate in your case.

Of course, how you solve any programming task is strongly influenced from what's available in your language of choice, and from your ability to use it.

Here I use library(assoc), if your system misses it then you could simulate using a list, or using assert/retract.

This fragment just shows a (idiomatic) way to count words, computing frequencies can be done easily with library(aggregate) or a bit of arithmetic, maybe you want to try to write down by yourself to exercise on the language...

/*  File:    frequency_of_words.pl
    Author:  Carlo,,,
    Created: May 23 2012
    Purpose: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/10711483/calculating-term-frequency-in-prolog
*/

:- module(frequency_of_words, [count_words/2, count_words/1]).
:- [library(assoc)].

count_words(File, Assoc) :-
    empty_assoc(Empty),
    open(File, read, Stream),
    frequency_of_words(Stream, Empty, Assoc, ""),
    close(Stream).
count_words(File) :-
    count_words(File, Assoc),
    assoc_to_list(Assoc, List),
    maplist(writeln, List).

frequency_of_words(Stream, SoFar, Words, CurrWord) :-
    get_code(Stream, Code),
    (   Code == -1
    ->  update_dictionary(SoFar, Words, CurrWord)
    ;   use_character(Code, SoFar, Updated, CurrWord, NextWord),
        frequency_of_words(Stream, Updated, Words, NextWord)
    ).

update_dictionary(SoFar, SoFar, Word) :-
    skip_word(Word).
update_dictionary(SoFar, Updated, Codes) :-
    atom_codes(Word, Codes),
    ( get_assoc(Word, SoFar, CountSoFar) ; CountSoFar = 0 ),
    WordCount is CountSoFar + 1,
    put_assoc(Word, SoFar, WordCount, Updated).

use_character(Code, SoFar, Updated, CurrWord, NextWord) :-
    (   word_character(Code)
    ->  Updated = SoFar,
        NextWord = [Code|CurrWord]
    ;   reverse(CurrWord, Forward),
        update_dictionary(SoFar, Updated, Forward),
        NextWord = ""
    ).

word_character(Code) :-
    [Code] @>= "A", [Code] @=< "Z" ;
    [Code] @>= "a", [Code] @=< "z" ;
    [Code] @>= "0", [Code] @=< "9" ;
    [Code] == "_".

skip_word(""). % a trick on EOF or consecutive blanks: not really a skipword
skip_word("is").

test:

?- count_words('frequency_of_words.pl').
0-2
1-3
2012-1
23-1
9-1
A-1
Author-1
Carlo-1
Code-14
Codes-2
CountSoFar-3
Created-1
CurrWord-6
EOF-1
Empty-2
File-3
Forward-2
Full-2
List-2
May-1
NextWord-5
Purpose-1
SoFar-11
StackOverflow-1
Stream-6
Updated-7
Word-5
WordCount-2
Words-3
Z-1
_-1
a-3
answer-1
assoc-1
assoc_to_list-1
atom_codes-1
blanks-1
close-1
consecutive-1
count_words-2
empty_assoc-1
frequency_of_words-5
get_assoc-1
get_code-1
library-1
maplist-1
module-1
not-1
on-1
open-1
or-1
pl-1
put_assoc-1
read-1
really-1
reverse-1
skip_word-3
skipword-1
trick-1
update_dictionary-4
use_character-2
word_character-2
writeln-1
z-1
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Thanks! This covers a lot of what I was looking for. –  E-Mumble May 23 '12 at 14:13
    
Having looked at this a lot longer... This solution uses an inline processing approach, i.e. one character at a time as it reads through the file. Is this how prolog experts naturally approach the problem? (The alternative is pipe-and-filter, where you first read the entire file, then filter non-alphanums out of the the entire data and produce another piece of data, then detect words and pass them on, etc. Would that make the logic of the rules simpler or more complicated in prolog?) –  E-Mumble May 23 '12 at 16:41
1  
I think that way the code would be more complicated, requiring more steps. If you read the entire file, then could use DCG, but here there is nothing to gain from that. The technique I used is similar to what is used for (very) simple scanners. –  CapelliC May 23 '12 at 19:43

For filtering stop words, a good way would be through assert:

read_sw(Path) :-
    open( Path, read, Stream ),
    read_words_file( Stream, Words ),
    add_sw(Words).

add_sw([]).
add_sw([Word|Rest]) :-
    assertz(stop_word(Word)),
    add_sw(Rest).

Once this is done, you can use stop_word/1 to check if a word is a stopword and ignore it. For instance, if you were implementing Scott Hunter's answer, you could add an additional clause in calc_freq/2 to filter out those words:

calc_freq( [], [] ).
calc_freq( [Word|Words], Freq ) :-
    stop_word(Word), !,
    calc_freq( Words, Freq ).
calc_freq( [Word|Words], Freq ) :-
    calc_freq( Words, FreqRest ),
    add_word( Word, FreqRest, Freq ).
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