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I have a Treemap with Strings as keys. I want to get all the values whose keys start with the String search.

I think what I need to do here is something like:

myTreeMap.subMap(search.concat(X1), true, search.concat(X2), true);

where X1 and X2 are the highest and lowest possible character.

Is there a better approach? If not, what are X1 and X2?

Thanks in advance.

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So you want the keys that start with the value in search? So if search is "foo", you're looking for "foo*" correct? –  Jim Barrows May 22 '12 at 23:36
    
yes, correct :) –  Hallucynogenyc May 23 '12 at 0:13
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

basically you need lexicographically next prefix as the second boundary:

public <T> Map<String, T> subMapWithKeysThatAreSuffixes(String prefix, NavigableMap<String, T> map) {
    if ("".equals(prefix)) return map;
    String lastKey = createLexicographicallyNextStringOfTheSameLenght(prefix);
    return map.subMap(prefix, true, lastKey, false);
}

String createLexicographicallyNextStringOfTheSameLenght(String input) {
    final int lastCharPosition = input.length()-1;
    String inputWithoutLastChar = input.substring(0, lastCharPosition);
    char lastChar = input.charAt(lastCharPosition) ;
    char incrementedLastChar = (char) (lastChar + 1);
    return inputWithoutLastChar+incrementedLastChar;
}
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Hmmmm. I would say you should do myTreeMap.subMap(search, true, search2, false) where search2 isn't concatenated, but is instead "incremented". After all, if X2 was just a character, then your implementation would miss search.concat(X2).concat(X2).

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increment String? I thing I'm lost in your answer –  Hallucynogenyc May 23 '12 at 0:13
    
Increment the last character in the String. For example, given "abc", use "abd" for search2. –  Louis Wasserman May 23 '12 at 0:21
    
yeah, but how do you do that? what if there are numbers? –  Hallucynogenyc May 23 '12 at 1:04
    
(char) (ch + 1) will return the next character after the character ch. –  Louis Wasserman May 23 '12 at 1:12
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The problem is the partial key search your trying to do.

myTreeMap.subMap(search.concat(X1), true, search.concat(X2), true);

Let's assume you have some key/value pairs:

fooBar -> Some value fooBage -> Some other value barBear -> Running out of value ideas barTender -> Another value

Now you want to find all "foo*", in this example fooBar and fooBage. The key is treated as a single token, that happens to be a string in this case. There is no way to treat the key as a partial key. Even saying you want "fooA" through "fooZ" won't get you fooBar, or fooBage.

If you make the key class (I'll call it FractionalKey), and override the equals method, then you can define equals as "some regex", or "either the entire thing, or just the first part" etc. the problem with this is that if equals returns true, then the hashcodes must also be equal, and this would break that rule I think.

I think this is your only option, other then searching the list of keys for the one you want.

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Since my edit to the answer above was rejected for being too original, I'll post it here. This answer fixes typos and handles int overflow which the original did not.

public <T> Map<String, T> subMapWithKeysThatAreSuffixes(String prefix, NavigableMap<String, T> map) {
    if ("".equals(prefix)) return map;
    String lastKey = createLexicographicallyNextStringOfTheSameLength(prefix);
    return map.subMap(prefix, true, lastKey, false);
}

String createLexicographicallyNextStringOfTheSameLength(String input) {
    final int lastCharPosition = input.length()-1;
    String inputWithoutLastChar = input.substring(0, lastCharPosition);
    char lastChar = input.charAt(lastCharPosition);
    char incrementedLastChar = (char) (lastChar + 1);
    // Handle int/char overflow.  This wasn't done above.
    if (incrementedLastChar == ((char) 0)) return input+incrementedLastChar;
    return inputWithoutLastChar+incrementedLastChar;
}
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