Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this number:

0101

and I know it is the binary sum of

0100
0001

How can I get those values from the first one?

EDIT

I have create a snippet of code based on the logic by JoeCortopassi. The snippet its this:

protected function _getSitesPublished($value) {
    static $bits = null;
    if (!$bits) {
        $bits = array ();
        $bit = 0;
        $x = 0;
        while ($bit < 4294967295) {
            $bit = pow (2, $x);
            $bits [$bit] = $bit;
                            ++ $x;
        }
    }
    $sites = array ();
    foreach ($bits as $bit) {
        if (($value & $bit) == $bit) {
            $sites [] = $bit;
        }
    }
    return $sites;
}

It only create the bits the first time the method its called. I have to make the comprobation

if (($value & $bit) == $bit)

since $value & $bit will return an int (may be other than 0, as in 6 & 3) and because of that I can't use only if ($value & $bit)

Thanks to all for your help.

EDIT 2 Oops! I had a little bug... forgot to increase the $x XD

share|improve this question
3  
Define "factor" - do you mean a value with only one bit set? –  Oli Charlesworth May 22 '12 at 23:33
3  
The same way you'd find factors for decimal numbers. Or do you just mean "extract all the 1 bits separately"? –  deceze May 22 '12 at 23:34
    
@deceze yeap, I want to factorize the number. Do you know how can I do it? –  AbrahamSustaita May 22 '12 at 23:44
    
@AbrahamSustaita: I don't think you mean "factorize" - see e.g. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integer_factorization. –  Oli Charlesworth May 22 '12 at 23:45
    
@OliCharlesworth So then what is the name for that? –  AbrahamSustaita May 22 '12 at 23:55
show 8 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using JoeCortopassi's code:

$value= bindec($binary);
$sums=array();
$counter=1;
while($counter<=$value){
    if($counter & value)
        $sums[]=$counter;
    $counter*=2;
}
print_r($sums);
share|improve this answer
add comment
$values = bindec('0101');

$bar  = 1; // 0001
$fizz = 2; // 0010
$foo  = 4; // 0100
$baz  = 8; // 1000


if ( $values & $bar )
{
   //returns true
}

if ( $values & $fizz )
{
   //returns false
}

if ( $values & $foo )
{
   //returns true
}

if ( $values & $baz )
{
   //returns false
}

EDIT:

Is this more of what you're looking for? Not able to run it right now to test, but it should convey the message:

function bitCheck($original, $num, $return)
{
    if ( $num == 0 )
    {
        return $return;
    }

    if ($original & $num)
    {
        $return[] = $num;
    }


    return bitCheck($original, $num-1,$return);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer its ok, but imagine I have 1111111111111111111... I don't like to make that lot of variables... –  AbrahamSustaita May 22 '12 at 23:55
    
@AbrahamSustaita it might help us better answer your question if you give us more info, like what you are trying to solve with this. What you're talking about is typically called bit masking and is used to store settings and such. –  JoeCortopassi May 23 '12 at 0:20
add comment

A Mathematica solution:

k[number_] := 
 ReplacePart[ConstantArray[0, Length@number], # -> 1] & /@ 
 (Position[number, 1] // Flatten)

Gives a list of the single bit components of the binary input:

(* k[{1, 0, 1, 1, 0}] ->  {{1, 0, 0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 1, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 0, 1, 0}} *) 

A Mathematica solution which takes a list of binary digits and returns a list of digit values.

   Clear[s];
    Options[s] := {Base -> 2, Totalled -> False};
    s[number_, OptionsPattern[]] := 
     With[{digitVals = 
        Reverse@Flatten@
           NestList[# OptionValue@Base &, {1}, Length@number - 1] number},
       If[OptionValue@Totalled, Total@digitVals, digitVals]]


(* s[{1, 0, 1, 0, 1}] -> {16, 0, 4, 0, 1} *)
share|improve this answer
    
other than your answer, I don't see how this was a mathematica question at all. –  rcollyer May 23 '12 at 1:24
    
OP tagged it mathematica. –  Tim Withers May 23 '12 at 2:58
add comment

The following works in java, which you could use similar logic in php or mathematica:

public class IntAsPowerOfTwo {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        printIntAsSumPowerOf2(256);
        printIntAsSumPowerOf2(15);
        printIntAsSumPowerOf2(-1023);
    }

    /**
     * Prints an integer as sum of powers of 2.
     * 
     * @param valueToEvaluate
     */
    public static void printIntAsSumPowerOf2(int valueToEvaluate) {
        if (valueToEvaluate < 0) {
            System.out.println("Integer to evaluate must be non negative.");
        }

        int runningValue = valueToEvaluate;
        int currPower = 0;

        // Increase until larger than current value.
        while (Math.pow(2, currPower) < runningValue) {
            currPower++;
        }

        // Output sum of power of 2s.
        boolean firstOutput = true;
        while (currPower >= 0) {
            if (runningValue >= Math.pow(2, currPower)) {
                if (firstOutput) {
                    System.out.print(valueToEvaluate + " = 2^" + currPower);
                    firstOutput = false;
                } else {
                    System.out.print(" + 2^" + currPower);
                }
                runningValue = runningValue - (int) Math.pow(2, currPower);
            }
            currPower--;
        }
        System.out.print("\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.