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Why do I can't make l->set(new StateB); in StateA? (this line is commented below)

It says:

main.cpp: In member function ‘virtual void StateA::writeName(Lap*, char*)’:
main.cpp:19:4: error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘struct Lap’
main.cpp:3:7: error: forward declaration of ‘struct Lap’

but I cant solve that :(

#include <stdio.h>

class Lap;
class State;
class StateB;
class StateA;

class State { public:
    virtual void writeName(Lap *l, char *str) = 0;
};
class StateB : public State { public:
    void writeName(Lap *l, char *str) {
        printf("%s B\n", str);
    }
};
class StateA : public State { public:
    void writeName(Lap *l, char *str) {
        printf("%s A\n", str);
        //l->set(new StateB);
    }
};
class Lap { public:
    State *ss;
    Lap(){
        printf("[Lap]\n");
        set(new StateA);
    }

    void set(State *s){
        ss = s;
    }

    void writeName(char *str){
        ss->writeName(this, str);
    }
};

int main()
{
    printf("\n\n");

    Lap lap;
    lap.writeName((char*)"Fulano");
    lap.writeName((char*)"Fulano");

    printf("\n\n");
    return 0;
}
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You're trying to use a method of an incomplete type. The forward declaration is there to let the compiler know the class exists. –  chris May 22 '12 at 23:50
    
@JesseGood Obviously, the broken part is commented out. –  Cicada May 22 '12 at 23:54
    
@JesseGood - g++, try to uncomment the line //l->set(new StateB); –  Fabricio May 22 '12 at 23:55
2  
@Cicada: Long day... :). –  Jesse Good May 22 '12 at 23:55
1  
@Fabricio, it's the problem. You've just told it that your class exists, not what all the members do. You need to include the header with the class in it instead in order to have the definitions there. –  chris May 23 '12 at 0:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that the forward declaration

class Lap;

only tells the compiler that such a class exists and lets you declare pointers to Lap, but it does not give the compiler enough information to handle any Lap method calls.

So you need to have Lap fully declared before the attempt to use its method.

With your code as given this can't be done in a single file because Lap does new StateA while StateA calls a method on Lap -- a circular dependency.

You'll need to move the declarations of at least one (and better yet, all) out to header files and include the headers where needed. Then the compiler will know the full interface details of the classes before either class's definitions try to use methods in the other class.

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