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When I use a <path> argument with git log --stat to limit the log to commits modifying <path>, git lists <path> as the only modified file when displaying the selected commits. I would instead like to see all modified paths listed for each selected commit.

For example:

$ echo test > a.txt
$ echo test > b.txt
$ git add a.txt b.txt
$ git commit -m test
 [...]
 2 files changed, 2 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 [...]
$ git log -n1 --stat
 [...]

 a.txt |    1 +
 b.txt |    1 +
 2 files changed, 2 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
$ git log -n1 --stat -- a.txt
 [...]

 a.txt |    1 +
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)

Note that the second git log, with the path argument a.txt, says "1 files changed", when in fact "2 files changed". I would like git to tell me that both a.txt and b.txt changed, even though I selected the commit based on the path a.txt.

UPDATE: @jacknagel answered my question, but it turns out his solution doesn't work in my real use case. In my real use case, I'm looking for all commits that modified a file, including renames, in a case where two related projects diverged. I need to figure out what changes in one project imply corresponding changes (I need to make) in the other project. Unfortunately, git complains when I try to use --full-diff and --follow at the same time.

So, in my real situation, I'm trying to run:

git log --stat --follow -- a.txt

and a solution that works in this case is:

git log --format='%H' --follow -- a.txt | xargs git show --stat -C
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What ever you ask doesn't make much sense to me. How do you expect a command to behave in a different way than it is intended to do? When you give the filename you are telling git to get the details of that file alone. If you want it to show both the stuff then use the command –  positron May 23 '12 at 5:24
    
@positron: I'm using the file name to identify commits of interests, but for those commits I want the full information. In essence, I'm using the given file name to identify other unknown file names of interest. So, I can't tell git the other files, because I don't know what they are. –  ntc2 May 23 '12 at 23:47
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can get this behavior using the --full-diff option:

   --full-diff
       Without this flag, "git log -p <path>..." shows commits that touch
       the specified paths, and diffs about the same specified paths. With
       this, the full diff is shown for commits that touch the specified
       paths; this means that "<path>..." limits only commits, and doesn't
       limit diff for those commits.

       Note that this affects all diff-based output types, e.g. those
       produced by --stat etc.
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Thanks! This answers the question I asked and so I'm accepting the answer. However, it turns out my question was not specific enough, and --full-diff doesn't work in my real situation, where I'm using --follow. I'll update the question and add a solution that works with --follow in another answer. –  ntc2 May 23 '12 at 23:33
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How do you expect a command to behave in a different way than it is intended to do? When you give the filename you are telling git to get the details of that file alone. If you want it to show both the files then use the command

git log -n1 --stat .

or

git log -n1 --stat a.txt b.txt
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1  
I think the idea is to say to git "show me only commits that touch <path>, but when showing those commits, list everything they did". –  jacknagel May 23 '12 at 5:32
    
@jacknagel: exactly. –  ntc2 May 23 '12 at 23:48
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