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I have a program I'm working on, rather starting, for a website that I have been making. The program is an HTML5 Canvas with JavaScript (and jQuery) game. To do this I have to be able to tell where in the canvas the user clicks. I could do it like this:

mouse = new Object();
mouse = {
   //Assign Temp Values 
   x: 0,
   y: 0,
   click: function(event) {
       //Code to get location and assign to mouse.x and mouse.y then handle click
   }
};

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#canvas').click(function(evt) {mouse.click(evt);}); 
});

Or I could do it like this:

mouse = new Object();
mouse = {
    x: 0,
    y: 0
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#canvas').click(function(evt) {
        //Code here to get location and assign to mouse.x and mouse.y and then handle click
    });
});

I know in this case that it is less code for the latter and I've seen questions like this for other languages but I was wondering if there are any advantages to using a method for event handling or a separate function in JavaScript. For example: one being good programming practice, or more efficient, or even easier to read. Any input would be appreciated.

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4  
If you're concerned with practice: 1. Use the var keyword. 2. mouse= new Object(); mouse = {...} is redundant, as the original object is lost immediately and you define an inline one. –  dwerner May 23 '12 at 0:40
    
Thanks, I normally remember var, I don't know what happened there. But thanks for clarifying on the new Object() declaration. Honestly I've always wondered on whether good practice dictated I do that because I have seen it a lot with something like a new Array() etc. –  user1411403 May 24 '12 at 2:59
    
Hey no problem. With array it is important because an array is not just an object; it has it's own built-in prototype, with special methods like push, etc. But then you still wouldn't initialize it twice. An inline array could be expressed var myarr = ['some', 'vals', 'here']; –  dwerner May 24 '12 at 8:25

2 Answers 2

Performance wise, the second method is slightly faster because you have one less method call, but there's no significant difference.

http://jsperf.com/method-vs-callback

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The only significant thing that occurs to me is this: if you use a method, then this is set to the object the method was called on. However, depending on browser, this may have a more useful value coming into the event handler, which would be good to preserve. You could always pass it to the method, but if you use a function instead, the value of this is available unchanged inside the function body.

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Thanks! Honestly the difference in effectiveness of this hadn't occurred to me being relatively new to the full extent of OOP in JS. Out of curiosity, what did you mean with depending on the browser? I guess I was just being optimistic but I thought this was actually something that was common among browsers... Rather I hoped it was. –  user1411403 May 24 '12 at 3:13

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