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im trying to count the characters inside a text file in c++, this is what i have so far, for some reason im getting 4. even thou i have 123456 characters in it. if i increase or decrease the characters i still get 4, please help and thanks in advance

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

const char FileName[] = "text.txt";

int main () 
{
string line;
ifstream inMyStream (FileName); 
int c;

if (inMyStream.is_open()) 
{

     while(  getline (inMyStream, line)){

             cout<<line<<endl;
              c++;
  }
    }
    inMyStream.close(); 

system("pause");
   return 0;
}
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4  
You're not initializing c. Also, you seem to be counting lines, not characters. –  chris May 23 '12 at 0:56
    
Do you mean counting lines or characters? I think this code is counting lines but you refer to counting characters. –  SirPentor May 23 '12 at 0:57
    
how do i count the characters, and if i only have one line why would it give me 4. –  user836910 May 23 '12 at 0:57
    
@user836910, because you didn't initialize the counting variable. You can use std::string::length to count characters though. –  chris May 23 '12 at 0:58
    
counting characters, –  user836910 May 23 '12 at 0:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're counting the lines.
You should count the characters. change it to:

while( getline ( inMyStream, line ) )
{
    cout << line << endl;
    c += line.length();
}
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1  
strlen should be line.length(). –  chris May 23 '12 at 0:58
    
Thanks @chris.. –  BeemerGuy May 23 '12 at 1:00
    
ahh i see, thank you. –  user836910 May 23 '12 at 1:02
1  
@chris stands corrected; you should initialize c to zero, otherwise you'll get unpredictable values. Change to int c = 0;. –  BeemerGuy May 23 '12 at 1:04
1  
@BeemerGuy.net, I've always grown up knowing "I stand corrected" to mean "I was wrong". That's where any confusion came from. –  chris May 23 '12 at 1:24

this is how i would approach the problem:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;


int main () 
{
string line;
int sum=0;
ifstream inData ;
inData.open("countletters.txt");

while(!inData.eof())
{
getline(inData,line);

    int numofChars= line.length();
    for (unsigned int n = 0; n<line.length();n++)
    { 
    if (line.at(n) == ' ')
    {
    numofChars--;
    }
    }
sum=numofChars+sum;
}
cout << "Number of characters: "<< sum << endl;
    return 0 ;
}
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There are probably hundreds of ways to do that. I believe the most efficient is:

    inMyStream.seekg(0,std::ios_base::end);
    std::ios_base::streampos end_pos = inMyStream.tellg();

    return end_pos;
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First of all, you have to init a local var, this means: int c = 0; instead of int c;

I think the old and easy to understand way is to use the get() function till the end char EOF

    char current_char;
    if (inMyStream.is_open()) 
        {

            while(inMyStream.get(current_char)){

                if(current_char == EOF)
                {
                    break;
                }
                c++;
            }
        }

Then c will be the count of the characters

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Just use good old C FILE pointers:

int fileLen(std::string fileName)
{
    FILE *f = fopen(fileName.c_str(), "rb");

    if (f ==  NULL || ferror(f))
    {
        if (f)
            fclose(f);

        return -1;
    }

    fseek(f, 0, SEEK_END);
    int len = fell(f);

    fclose(f);

    return len;
}
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use "rb" instead of "r" to avoid end of line translation errors –  EvilTeach May 23 '12 at 1:22
    
This technique can be done with streams, there's no reason to rewrite everything from scratch in C. –  Mooing Duck Aug 2 '13 at 19:27

I found out this simple method , hope this helps

while(1)
    {
        if(txtFile.peek() == -1)
            break;
        c = txtFile.get();
        if(c != txtFile.eof())
                    noOfChars++;
    }
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