Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can not figure out how to convert a hash into a multidimensional array. I have the following hash produced from roo after reading an Excel spreadsheet:

{[1, 1]=>"string-1", [1, 2]=>"string-2", [1, 3]=>"string-3", [1, 4]=>"string-4", 
[1, 5]=>"string-5", [1, 6]=>"string-6", [1, 7]=>"string-7", [2, 1]=>"string-1", 
[2, 2]=>"string-2", [2, 3]=>numeric-1, [2, 4]=>numeric-2, [2, 5]=>"string-3", 
[2, 6]=>"string-4", [2, 7]=>numeric-3, [3, 1]=>"string-1", [3, 2]=>"string-2", 
[3, 3]=>numeric-1, [3, 4]=>numeric-2, [3, 5]=>"string-3", [3, 6]=>"string-4", 
[3, 7]=>numeric-3, ... etc}

I need to convert this to:

[["string-1", "string-2", "string-3", "string-4", "string-5", "string-6", "string-7"], 
["string-1", "string-2", numeric-1, numeric-2, "string-3", "string-4", numeric-3], 
["string-1", "string-2", numeric-1, numeric-2, "string-3", "string-4", numeric-3],
... etc]

I tried the following but it is just copying everything into one array, rather than embedded arrays:

2.upto(input.last_row).each do |row|
  ((input.first_column)..(input.last_column)).map{ |col| 
    $rows << input.cell(row, col) if col != 5 and col <= 10}.join(" ")
end

I have searched for the answer for hours but can not find a solution.

The following ended up being my workable solution:

((xlsx.first_row)..(xlsx.last_row)).each do |row|
  ((xlsx.first_column)..(xlsx.last_column)).each do |col|
    $tmp_row << xlsx.cell(row, col) if col != 5 and col <= 10
  end
remove_newlines_from_strings($tmp_row)
$rows_sheet_0 << $tmp_row
$tmp_row = []
end
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

If you're using 1.9+ then you can take advantage of ordered Hashes with something like this:

a_of_as = spreadsheet.group_by { |k, v| k.first }.map { |k, v| v.map(&:last) }

If you're not certain that the Hash will be built in the proper order, then you could force the "sort by coordinate" like this:

a_of_as = spreadsheet.sort_by  { |k, v| k }
                     .group_by { |k, v| k.first }
                     .map      { |k, v| v.map(&:last) }

I'm assuming that there aren't any gaps in the grid but that seems like a safe assumption when dealing with a spreadsheet.

For example (reformatted for compactness):

>> pp spreadsheet
{[1, 1]=>"string-1", [1, 2]=>"string-2", [1, 3]=>"string-3",  [1, 4]=>"string-4",  [1, 5]=>"string-5", [1, 6]=>"string-6", [1, 7]=>"string-7",
 [2, 1]=>"string-1", [2, 2]=>"string-2", [2, 3]=>"numeric-1", [2, 4]=>"numeric-2", [2, 5]=>"string-3", [2, 6]=>"string-4", [2, 7]=>"numeric-3",
 [3, 1]=>"string-1", [3, 2]=>"string-2", [3, 3]=>"numeric-1", [3, 4]=>"numeric-2", [3, 5]=>"string-3", [3, 6]=>"string-4", [3, 7]=>"numeric-3"}

>> pp spreadsheet.group_by { |k, v| k.first }.map { |k, v| v.map(&:last) }
[["string-1", "string-2", "string-3",  "string-4",  "string-5", "string-6", "string-7"],
 ["string-1", "string-2", "numeric-1", "numeric-2", "string-3", "string-4", "numeric-3"],
 ["string-1", "string-2", "numeric-1", "numeric-2", "string-3", "string-4", "numeric-3"]]

>> spreadsheet2 = Hash[spreadsheet.sort { |(ka,va),(kb,vb)| kb <=> ka }]
>> pp spreadsheet2
{[3, 7]=>"numeric-3", [3, 6]=>"string-4", [3, 5]=>"string-3", [3, 4]=>"numeric-2", [3, 3]=>"numeric-1", [3, 2]=>"string-2", [3, 1]=>"string-1", 
 [2, 7]=>"numeric-3", [2, 6]=>"string-4", [2, 5]=>"string-3", [2, 4]=>"numeric-2", [2, 3]=>"numeric-1", [2, 2]=>"string-2", [2, 1]=>"string-1",
 [1, 7]=>"string-7",  [1, 6]=>"string-6", [1, 5]=>"string-5", [1, 4]=>"string-4",  [1, 3]=>"string-3",  [1, 2]=>"string-2",  [1, 1]=>"string-1"}

>> pp spreadsheet2.sort_by { |k,v| k }.group_by { |k, v| k.first }.map { |k, v| v.map(&:last) }
[["string-1", "string-2", "string-3",  "string-4",  "string-5", "string-6", "string-7"],
 ["string-1", "string-2", "numeric-1", "numeric-2", "string-3", "string-4", "numeric-3"],
 ["string-1", "string-2", "numeric-1", "numeric-2", "string-3", "string-4", "numeric-3"]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the great suggestion. I tried it and am getting the following error: undefined method `group_by' for #<Excelx:0x48fdf20> –  user1411496 May 23 '12 at 4:41
    
@user1411496: spreadsheet should be your Hash, not your actual spreadsheet. –  mu is too short May 23 '12 at 4:45
    
The spreadsheet is my hash ... input.default_sheet = input.sheets[0] (from roo). My hash is then "input" ... –  user1411496 May 23 '12 at 5:02
    
If input.is_a? Hash is true then input.group_by { ... } should work. –  mu is too short May 23 '12 at 5:07
h = {[1, 1]=>"string-1",[1, 2]=>"string-2",[1, 3]=>"string-3",[1, 4]=>"string-4",
[1,5]=>"string-5",[1, 6]=>"string-6",[1, 7]=>"string-7",[2, 1]=>"string-1",
[2, 2]=>"string-2",[2, 3]=>"numeric-1",[2, 4]=>"numeric-2",[2, 5]=>"string-3",
[2, 6]=>"string-4",[2, 7]=>"numeric-3",[3, 1]=>"string-1",[3, 2]=>"string-2",
[3, 3]=>"numeric-1",[3, 4]=>"numeric-2",[3, 5]=>"string-3",[3, 6]=>"string-4",
[3, 7]=>"numeric-3"}

h.each_with_object(Hash.new([])){ |m,res| res[m.first.first] += [m.last] }.values

#=>[["string-1","string-2","string-3","string-4","string-5","string-6","string-7"],
#=> ["string-1","string-2","numeric-1","numeric-2","string-3","string-4","numeric-3"],
#=> ["string-1","string-2","numeric-1","numeric-2","string-3","string-4","numeric-3"]]

Thanks to mu is too short's hint I can rewrite it a little bit:

h.each_with_object(Hash.new{|h,k|h[k]=[]}) do |m,res| 
  res[m.first.first] << m.last 
end.values
share|improve this answer
1  
You might want to note why you're not falling into the usual Hash.new([]) trap. –  mu is too short May 23 '12 at 2:26
    
What is the trap? –  megas May 23 '12 at 2:29
    
Look at what [1].each_with_object(Hash.new([])) { |i,h| h[i] << i } does and you should see it. –  mu is too short May 23 '12 at 2:32
1  
h[i] << i does work, the problem is that Hash.new(x) simply returns x when there is a missing, it doesn't add the key to the Hash. res[m.first.first] += [m.last] works for two reasons: (1) it is the same as res[m.first.first] = res[m.first.first] + [m.last] so the assignment will create the key in res and (2) Array#+ creates a new array rather than modifying either of its operands so you're actually doing res[x] = [] + [m.last] and the default value doesn't get changed. Perhaps looking at [1,2].each_with_object(Hash.new([])) { |i,h| a = h[i]; a << i; h[i] = a } will help. –  mu is too short May 23 '12 at 2:49
1  
res[m.first.first] += [m.last] works due to the assignment (=) which creates the key and the duplication (+) which avoids altering the default. Traps: (1) Hash.new(x) doesn't create keys when they're accessed, it just returns x when the key isn't there, (2) be very careful about accidentally altering the default value since it isn't duplicated when used, it just returns the reference. –  mu is too short May 23 '12 at 3:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.