Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

ok, this is really my first time doing my first class with javaScript, I have studied to use JQuery so much for months so its not really not hard me to teach. In this code I will be asking a lot of questions..

ok this is the code my first javascript class

window.myclass = function(){
    this.n1 = 0;
    this.n2 = 0;
    this.ans = 0;
    this.hehe = 0;

    this.defaultNumbersAdd = function(){

       this.hehe =setInterval(function(){
          //just an example of inert function...
          //the truth is i can't grab the this.n1 and this.n2...
          this.ans = this.n1 + this.n2;
       },100);
       clearTimeout(this.hehe);
    };

    this.returnAns = function(){
       return this.ans;
    };

    this.getAnswer = function(){
        this.defaultNumbersAdd(); //i want to reuse this function but I can't access it
        return this.returnAns(); //and also this one
    };

    this.modifynumbers = function(n1,n2){
        this.n1 = n1;
        this.n2 = n2;
    };
};

var myclassins = new window.myclass();
alert(myclassins.getAnswer);

now my questions are

1) how can i grab the class variables(this.vars) to be used inside my functions

2) how can i use other functions inside of another function

NOTE: sorry if my explanation is kinda vague...

share|improve this question
    
+1 for a very well written and interesting question. It shows research effort, willingness to dig in and try things, and very clear, specific questions about the problem. –  jmort253 May 23 '12 at 3:41
    
hehehe thank, a lot of answers has been given... now I hope I would not be confused anymore and take away my Java mind to javascript programming –  Mahan May 23 '12 at 3:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The this pointer directly inside of your window.myclass object points to that object itself, and you're using it to define what are essentially properties of that object, such as n1 and n2.

However, from within the functions defined within your object, the this pointer refers to the function, not the object. ***However, within setTimeouts and setIntervals, the "this" keyword refers to the window object, or the global scope. (See update at the bottom for example.)

Thus, you can just simply access the properties directly, using the name of the variable at the global scope which you used to instantiate the class,

    this.returnAns = function(){
       return myclassins.ans;
    };

However, the above method ties your class to the name given to the object at instantiation time, and is only useful for a single object.

A better solution is to define a variable within the object and reference the "this" pointer using it:

window.myclass = function(){
    this.n1 = 0;
    this.n2 = 0;
    this.ans = 0;
    this.hehe = 0;
    var _self = this;   // reference to "this"

    this.defaultNumbersAdd = function(){

       myclass.hehe =setInterval(function(){
          //just an example of inert function...
              //the truth is i can't grab the this.n1 and this.n2...
          _self.ans = _self.n1 + _self.n2;
          console.log(_self.ans);
       },100);
       clearTimeout(_self.hehe);
    };

    this.returnAns = function(){
       return _self.ans;
    };

    this.getAnswer = function(){
        this.defaultNumbersAdd(); //i want to reuse this function but I can't access it
        return _self.returnAns(); //and also this one
    };

    this.modifynumbers = function(n1,n2){
        _self.n1 = n1;
        _self.n2 = n2;
    };
};

Lastly, another technique is to define the function using a closure, passing in the "this" pointer into a function that returns another function, like so:

    this.modifynumbers = (function(__this) {
        return function(n1,n2){
            __this.n1 = n1;
            __this.n2 = n2;
        }
    })(this);

The least complex method, of course, is to use the var self; however, in JavaScript there are several different ways to accomplish a task, and these techniques can prove handy in different scenarios.

UPDATE:

@apsillers pointed out that the "this" keyword points to the window object when referenced inside callbacks invoked by setTimeout and setInterval functions. Here is an example:

// top level scope
var global = "globalvalue";

window.demo = function() {
    this.somevar = "somevalue";        

    this.someFunct = function() {
        console.info("somevar = " + this.somevar);  // prints "somevalue"
        console.info("global = " + this.global);   // prints undefined! this points to "demo"!

        setTimeout( function() {
            console.info("timeout - somevar = " + this.somevar);  // undefined! references the "window" context
            console.info("timeout - global = " + this.global);   // prints "globalvalue"
        },1000);
    };
};
var dem = new demo();

dem.somevar;   // accessible from outside the object. prints "somevalue"
dem.someFunct();

Output of someFunct():

# inside method of object
somevar = somevalue
global = undefined

# inside timeout
timeout - somevar = undefined
timeout - global = globalvalue

As you can see, inside of a setTimeout, "this" clearly points to the window, or global scope! (NOTE: You can actually take that little code snippet and run it in your Chrome or Firebug debugger.)

share|improve this answer
    
now i got it! hahah thank you –  Mahan May 23 '12 at 3:48
    
@jmort253: "However, from within the functions defined within your object, the this pointer refers to the function, not the object." -- Actually, this points to the window object within callbacks called from setTimeout and setTimeout. When you pass a callback to a function (like setInterval in this example), that function can set the value of this within the callback to whatever it wants, using callback.apply(someValueForThis). (MDN docs for apply.) –  apsillers May 23 '12 at 3:52
    
Also, the rest of your answer is pretty rock-solid and comprehensive. –  apsillers May 23 '12 at 3:56
    
@apsillers - Thank you for making Stackoverflow such a great place! I learn something new everyday here. I tried this out myself to confirm it is indeed correct, and then added this to my answer so it's crystal clear that within setTimeout/setInterval, the "this" keyword references the global scope. Thanks again for pointing "this" out. (pun intended). :) Also, thanks for the link to "apply". I can already think of several places where that would come in handy in a project I'm working on. –  jmort253 May 23 '12 at 5:33

You can use the module pattern, described in this article. The benefit of using it is that you can have private variables, and expose only those you want to be public.

var Myclass = (function(){

    var

    // Private
    n1 = 0,
    n2 = 0,
    ans = 0,
    hehe = 0,

    defaultNumbersAdd = function(){
       hehe = setInterval(function(){
          this.ans = this.n1 + this.n2;
       },100);
       clearTimeout(hehe);
    },

    returnAns = function(){
       return ans;
    },

    getAnswer = function(){
        this.defaultNumbersAdd();
        return returnAns()    
    },

    modifynumbers = function(n1 ,n2){
        n1 = n1;
        n2 = n2;
    };

    // Public
    return {
      defaultNumbersAdd: defaultNumbersAdd,
      getAnswer: getAnswer,
      modifynumbers: modifynumbers
    };
}());

// Then you can use the object as it already exists
myclass.method();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - The online book looks like a great read! –  jmort253 May 23 '12 at 3:35
    
thank you, the article was great –  Mahan May 23 '12 at 3:42

I think you're confused by the 'this' keyword.

'this' refers to the current object context. With setInterval you pass the function into another context where this means something else. So you can either assign this to a variable which passes the object currently being referred to or inside defaultNumbers.add you can assign the properties to vars:

this.defaultNumbersAdd = function(){
   var ans = this.ans,
   n1 = this.n1,
   n2 = this.n2;

   this.hehe =setInterval(function(){
      //just an example of inert function...
      //the truth is i can't grab the this.n1 and this.n2...
      ans = n1 + n2;
   },100);
   clearTimeout(this.hehe);
};
share|improve this answer
    
hahah yeah... i was playing with this.. and save all my variables with this... thinking it was a private variable for this class –  Mahan May 23 '12 at 3:38
    
+1 - Great explanation of "this" and how it changes given the context. –  jmort253 May 23 '12 at 3:39

I usually declare a new variable for this:

window.myclass = function(){
....
....

var self = this
....
....
}

now you can call self. ..... what ever you want

share|improve this answer
    
is this.<a function> and self.<a function> the same? –  Mahan May 23 '12 at 3:27
    
Yes. this refers to the instance object or if the class is used as a regular function whatever object the function is inside of. –  Erik Reppen May 23 '12 at 3:28
    
Yes, because JavaScript copies objects by reference, so this === self. –  apsillers May 23 '12 at 3:29

Point #1: If you want all the member variables from an object, use for(.. in ..):

// output all keys and values
for(key in myclassins) {
    console.log(key, myclassins[key]);
}

Note that functions are first-class variables in JavaScript, so if you only want to enumerate the non-function member variables of myclassins, do:

// output all keys and values that are not functions
for(key in myclassins) {
    if(!myclassins[key] instanceof Function) {
        console.log(key, myclassins[key]);
    }
}

Point #2: In JavaScript, the this variable is called the context of the function. The context may change -- when you call setInterval, for example, it causes the anonymous function to run with a context of this == window instead of the context of the current object. If you want to refer to the context of the current object, store it in another variable at the start of your constructor, like var self = this;, and then refer to self in the anonymous setInterval function when you want to refer to the object.

This works because JavaScript supports closures, which means that when you define a function, that new function has access to all the variables that current exist in the current scope, including (in this case) self.

Notes:

  • JavaScript is prototype-based, not class-based. It can be a difficult distinction to understand, and not one that has any bearing on your exact code. However, you may find people correcting you if you say "JavaScript class".

  • It's traditional to initial-caps CamelCase the names of types, e.g., instance fooBar is of type FullTimeEmployee (not fullTimeEmployee or fulltimeemployee).

share|improve this answer
    
haha thank you for prototype thing... hehe so it means i can add functions within existing js objects... example... the Array object.. Am I right? –  Mahan May 23 '12 at 3:45
    
Yes, absolutely. Array.prototype.getFirst = function() { return this[0]; } will allow you to do myArr = [1,2,3]; myArr.getFirst(); (which returns 1 here). –  apsillers May 23 '12 at 3:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.