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I want to sum a 2 dimensional array in python:

Here is what I have:

def sum1(input):
    sum = 0
    for row in range (len(input)-1):
        for col in range(len(input[0])-1):
            sum = sum + input[row][col]

    return sum


print sum1([[1, 2],[3, 4],[5, 6]])

It displays 4 instead of 21 (1+2+3+4+5+6 = 21). Where is my mistake?

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reduce(lambda x, y: x + sum(y), [[1, 2],[3, 4],[5, 6]], 0) :-). But yeah, problem is in your range as others pointed out. –  Vikas May 23 '12 at 3:54

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is the issue

for row in range (len(input)-1):
    for col in range(len(input[0])-1):

try

for row in range (len(input)):
    for col in range(len(input[0])):

Python's range(x) goes from 0..x-1 already

range(...) range([start,] stop[, step]) -> list of integers

Return a list containing an arithmetic progression of integers.
range(i, j) returns [i, i+1, i+2, ..., j-1]; start (!) defaults to 0.
When step is given, it specifies the increment (or decrement).
For example, range(4) returns [0, 1, 2, 3].  The end point is omitted!
These are exactly the valid indices for a list of 4 elements.
share|improve this answer

You could rewrite that function as,

def sum1(input):
    return sum(map(sum, input))

Basically, map(sum, input) will return a list with the sums across all your rows, then, the outer most sum will add up that list.

Example:

>>> a=[[1,2],[3,4]]
>>> sum(map(sum, a))
10
share|improve this answer

Better still, forget the index counters and just iterate over the items themselves:

def sum1(input):
    my_sum = 0
    for row in input:
        my_sum += sum(row)
    return my_sum

print sum1([[1, 2],[3, 4],[5, 6]])

One of the nice (and idiomatic) features of Python is letting it do the counting for you. sum() is a built-in and you should not use names of built-ins for your own identifiers.

share|improve this answer

You can use a recursive solution:

def sum_up(x):
    my_sum = 0
    for ele in x:
        if isinstance(ele, int):
            my_sum += ele
        elif isinstance(ele, list):
            my_sum += sum_up(ele)
    return my_sum

Result:

>>> sum_up([[1, 2],[3, 4],[5, 6]])
21
>>> sum_up([[[2,2],2,[[3,2],1]]])
12

And numpy solution is just:

import numpy as np
x = np.array([[1, 2],[3, 4],[5, 6]])

Result:

>>> np.sum(x)
21
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2  
If your find you are using isinstance for a problem as simple as this, you are probably thinking in a strongly-typed fashion. This is an overly complex answer. –  msw May 23 '12 at 4:01
    
@msw, true, but using recursion this way has its advantages, since it is more flexible, as I showed it works for any strange forms of list. But at least another part of my answer was simple :). –  Akavall May 23 '12 at 4:19
    
It is indeed more flexible. I have found that on stackoverflow and in coding generally, that excessive flexibility is sometimes a burden. For example, I'd rather see sum([1, [2, 3]]) raise a TypeError than guess at what I intended. This is particularly relevant for novice questions on SO. –  msw May 23 '12 at 4:30

I think this is better:

 >>> x=[[1, 2],[3, 4],[5, 6]]                                                   
>>> sum(sum(x,[]))                                                             
21
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Shortest solution ! Why does not anyone vote it up? –  BachT Jul 5 '13 at 5:43

range() in python excludes the last element. In other words, range(1, 5) is [1, 5) or [1, 4]. So you should just use len(input) to iterate over the rows/columns.

def sum1(input):
    sum = 0
    for row in range (len(input)):
        for col in range(len(input[0])):
            sum = sum + input[row][col]

    return sum
share|improve this answer

Don't put -1 in range(len(input)-1) instead use:

range(len(input))

range automatically returns a list one less than the argument value so no need of explicitly giving -1

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This is yet another alternate Solution

In [1]: a=[[1, 2],[3, 4],[5, 6]]
In [2]: sum([sum(i) for i in a])
Out[2]: 21
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