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I have a ColdFusion function "foo" which takes three args, and the second two are optional:

<cffunction name="foo" access="public" returntype="any">
    <cfargument name="arg1" type="any" required="true" />
    <cfargument name="arg2" type="any" required="false" default="arg2" />
    <cfargument name="arg3" type="any" required="false" default="arg3" />

    ...

    <cfreturn whatever />
</cffunction>

I want to call foo, passing in arg1 and arg3, but leaving out arg2. I know that this is possible if I call the function using cfinvoke, but that syntax is really verbose and complicated. I have tried these two approaches, neither works:

<cfset somevar=foo(1, arg3=3) /> <!--- gives syntax error --->
<cfset somevar=foo(1, arg3:3) /> <!--- gives syntax error --->
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4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You have to use named arguments throughout. You can't mix named and positional arguments as you can in some other languages.

<cfset somevar = foo(arg1=1, arg3=3) />
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Or.. you can use ArgumentCollection

In CF9 or above...

<cfset somevar = foo(argumentCollection={arg1=1, arg3=3})>

In CF8 or above...

<cfset args = {arg1=1, arg3=3}>
<cfset somevar = foo(argumentCollection=args)>

If CF7 or below...

<cfset args = structNew()>
<cfset args.arg1 = 1>
<cfset args.arg3 = 3>
<cfset somevar = foo(argumentCollection=args)>
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This is how I generally prefer to do it. I'm more than likely determining which arguments to include at runtime. It's nice and easy to wrap <cfset args.foo=bar> inside a <cfif> block. –  Al E. Jul 2 '09 at 13:23
1  
As Al implies, you should update your examples to show that a major benefit of ArgumentCollection is that it allows you to build/manipulate the structs in a flexible fashion, before sending it to the function - your current examples are just a long-winded way of using all named arguments. :) –  Peter Boughton Jul 4 '09 at 21:10
1  
Also worth noting is that you can mix-and-match named arguments and ArgumentCollection in a single function call. –  Peter Boughton Jul 4 '09 at 21:12
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if you use named args you have to name the first too

<cffunction name="foo" access="public" returntype="any">
    <cfargument name="arg1" type="any" required="true" />
    <cfargument name="arg2" type="any" required="false" default="arg2" />
    <cfargument name="arg3" type="any" required="false" default="arg3" />

    <cfreturn arg2 & " " & arg3>
</cffunction>


<cfset b = foo(arg1:1,arg3:2)>
<cfoutput>#b#</cfoutput>
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I too was looking for some answers as Kip posted. Following is what I implemented. Hope it could add to our chain of possible solutions. I just added <cfparam> to the cffunction code:

<cffunction name="fn1" access="public" returntype="numeric">
   <cfargument name="arg1" type="numeric" required="true">
   <cfargument name="arg2" type="numeric" required="true">
   <cfargument name="arg3" type="query" required="false">
   <cfparam name="arguments.arg1" default=0>
   <cfparam name="arguments.arg2" default=0>
   <cfparam name="arguments.arg3" default=0>
   <cfreturn arguments.arg1 + arguments.arg2 + arguments.arg3>
</cffunction>

<cfoutput>#fn1(arg1=1,arg2=2)#</cfoutput>
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I don't think that will work since <cfparam> is meant to "Tests for the existence of a parameter (that is, a variable), validates its data, and, if a default value is not assigned, optionally provides one." In this case, you label them as required, so by the time the cfparams are hit, you are guaranteed that args 1-3 exist. (If they didn't, the function call would throw an error.) You could provide a default in the argument and make it not required, but I'm guessing in this context that that is what you are trying to avoid. –  bean5 Oct 24 '13 at 14:26
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