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I'm using Scala 2.9

I have a class:

    class Queue[T] private( private val heading: List[T], private val trailing: List[T] ) {
        def this( a: T* ) = this( a.toList, Nil )

        private def mirror = {
            if ( heading.isEmpty ) {
                new Queue[T]( trailing.reverse, Nil )
            } else this
        }

        def head = {
            val q = mirror
            if ( q.heading.isEmpty ) None else new Some(q.heading.head)
        }

        def tail = {
            val q = mirror
            if ( q.heading.isEmpty ) q else new Queue[T]( q.heading.tail, trailing )
        }

        def enqueue( a: T ) = {
            new Queue[T]( heading, a::trailing )
        }
    }

In method enqueue, if I write new Queue( heading, a::trailing )(leaving out the type parameter [T]), the code won't compile and scalac complaints about "ambiguous reference to overloaded definition, both constructor Queue in class Queue of type (a: T*)Queue[T] and constructor Queue in class Queue of type (heading: List[T], trailing: List[T])Queue[T] match argument types (List[T],List[T])".

So why is it necessary to explicitly specify the type parameter[T] otherwise Scala will treat the two separate Lists as a whole for a repeat parameter? I think it has something to do with type inference, could someone please explain it?

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2 Answers 2

If you don't give the type argument, the compiler could either infer T (for the primary constructor) or List[T] (for the auxiliary constructor).

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Thank you Heiko. Apparently I failed to realize that the auxiliary constructor can be applied for 2 List[U] with T=List[U]. –  digizer0 May 23 '12 at 8:09

Heiko's answer is correct, but to clarify this a bit, the T in enqueue is a different T than the one in the context of the Queue you are about to create and has therefore to be inferred which leads to the ambiguity. Why do you have 2 constructors anyway? I would suggest you to use a companion for your constructor for the outer world:

class Queue[T] private( private val heading: List[T], private val trailing: List[T]) { /* ... */}

object Queue {
  def apply[T](xs: T*) = new Queue(xs.toList, Nil)
}
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Thank you drexin. I do not quite understand your point that the T in enqueue is a different T than the one in the context of the Queue you are about to create I think the T in enqueue is the same as the T in class Queue[T], that's why a::trailing does not give an error. And I'd better make Queue a Trait and use object as a factory to the outer world. Thank you for the suggestion. –  digizer0 May 23 '12 at 8:17
    
The T in new Queue is not specified, so the compiler tries to infer it. As you have two constructor that match your List[T], List[T] constructor the compiler can not infer the constructor you want to call. When you pass in the T from your current context explicitly, the compiler knows, that the T of the new instance should be your old T and not List[T]. –  drexin May 23 '12 at 9:36
    
I understand now. Thank you very much. –  digizer0 May 24 '12 at 7:21

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