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I've heard much about the understandable abhors of using .Select in Excel VBA Macros, but am unsure of how to avoid using them, or a good resource that can shed some light on how to avoid it.

I've only recently started writing macros, and am finding that my code would be more re-usable if I were able to use variables instead of Select functions. However, I am not sure how I am able to to refer to things (like the ActiveCell etc.) if not using Select. I have found this article on ranges and this example on the benefits of not using select but can't find anything on how .

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4 Answers

up vote 73 down vote accepted

Some examples of how to avoid select

Use Dim'd variables

Dim rng as Range

Set the variable to the required range. There are many ways to refer to a single-cell range

Set rng = Range("A1")
Set rng = Cells(1,1)
Set rng = [A1]
Set rng = Range("NamedRange")

or a multi-cell range

Set rng = Range("A1:B10")
Set rng = Range(Cells(1,1), Cells(2,10))
Set rng = [A1:B10]
Set rng = Range("AnotherNamedRange")

All the above examples refer to cells on the active sheet. Unless you specifically want to work only with the active sheet, it is better to Dim a Worksheet variable too

Dim ws As Worksheet
Set ws = Worksheets("Sheet1")
Set rng = ws.Cells(1,1)

Again, this refers to the active workbook, so you may want to be explicit here too.

Dim wb As Workbook
Set wb = Application.Workbooks("Book1")
Set rng = wb.Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1")

Pass ranges to your Sub's and Function's as Range variables

Sub ClearRange(r as Range)
    r.ClearContents
    '....
End Sub

Sub MyMacro()
    Dim rng as Range
    Set rng = [A1:B10]
    ClearRange rng
End Sub

You should also apply Methods (such as Find and Copy) to variables

Dim rng1 As Range
Dim rng2 As Range
Set rng1 = [A1:A10]
Set rng2 = [B1:B10]
rng1.Copy rng2

If you are looping over a range of cells it is often better (faster) to copy the range values to a variant array first and loop over that

Dim dat As Variant
Dim rng As Range
Dim i As Long

Set rng = [A1:A10000]
dat = rng.Value  ' dat is now array (1 to 10000, 1 to 1)
for i = LBound(dat, 1) to UBound(dat, 1)
    dat(i,1) = dat(i,1) * 10 'or whatever operation you need to perform
next
rng = dat.Value ' put new values back on sheet

This is a small taster for what's possible.

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2  
+1 Really good summary of exactly what i was after. Hopefully more people will get pointed here rather than the fruitless searches i was getting! –  BiGXERO May 23 '12 at 23:26
3  
+1 very nice [apart from the square brackets] –  whytheq Mar 15 '13 at 21:42
    
@chrisneilsen - This is one of the most comprehensive answers I have seen here. +1 –  leemo Nov 24 '13 at 23:32
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Two Main reasons why .Select/.Activate/Selection/Activecell/Activesheet/Activeworkbook etc... should be avoided

  1. It slows down your code.
  2. It is usually the main cause of runtime errors.

How do we avoid it?

1) Directly work with the relevant objects

Consider this code

Sheets("Sheet1").Activate
Range("A1").Select
Selection.Value = "Blah"
Selection.NumberFormat = "@"

This code can also be written as

With Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A1")
    .Value = "Blah"
    .NumberFormat = "@"
End With

2) If required declare your variables. The same code above can be written as

Dim ws as worksheet

Set ws = Sheets("Sheet1")

With ws.Range("A1")
    .Value = "Blah"
    .NumberFormat = "@"
End With
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Please note that in the following I'm comparing the Select approach (the one that the OP wants to avoid), with the Range approach (and this is the answer to the question). So don't stop reading when you see the first Select.

It really depends on what you are trying to do. Anyway a simple example could be useful. Let's suppose that you want to set the value of the active cell to "foo". Using ActiveCell you would write something like this:

Sub Macro1()
    ActiveCell.Value = "foo"
End Sub

If you want to use it for a cell that is not the active one, for instance for "B2", you should select it first, like this:

Sub Macro2()
    Range("B2").Select
    Macro1
End Sub

Using Ranges you can write a more generic macro that can be used to set the value of any cell you want to whatever you want:

Sub SetValue(cellAddress As String, aVal As Variant)
    Range(cellAddress).Value = aVal
End Sub

Then you can rewrite Macro2 as:

Sub Macro2()
    SetCellValue "B2", "foo"
End Sub

And Macro1 as:

Sub Macro1()
    SetValue ActiveCell.Address, "foo"
End Sub

Hope this helps to clear things up a little bit.

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Thanks for the excellent response so quickly. So does that mean that if i would normally add cells to range, name the range, and iterate through it, i should jump straight to creating an array? –  BiGXERO May 23 '12 at 6:33
    
I'm not sure I understand what you mean, but you can create a Range with a single instruction (e.g. Range("B5:C14")) and you can even set its value at once (if it has to be the same for every cell in the range), e.g. Range("B5:C14").Value = "abc" –  Francesco Baruchelli May 23 '12 at 6:50
4  
it'd be better to read the whole answer :-) –  Francesco Baruchelli May 23 '12 at 7:36
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I'm going to give the short answer since everyone else gave the long one.

You'll get .select and .activate whenever you record macros and reuse them. When you .select a cell or sheet it just makes it active. From that point on whenever you use unqualified references like Range.Value they just use the active cell and sheet. This can also be problematic if you don't watch where your code is placed or a user clicks on the workbook.

So, you can elinate these issues by directly referencing your cells. Which goes:

'create and set a range
Dim Rng As Excel.Range
Set Rng = Workbooks("Book1").Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1")
'OR
Set Rng = Workbooks(1).Worksheets(1).Cells(1, 1)

Or you could

'Just deal with the cell directly rather than creating a range
'I want to put the string "Hello" in Range A1 of sheet 1
Workbooks("Book1").Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1").value = "Hello"
`OR
Workbooks(1).Worksheets(1).Cells(1, 1).value = "Hello"

There are various combinations of these methods, but that would be the general idea expressed as shortly as possible for impatient people like me.

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protected by brettdj Dec 1 '13 at 9:53

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