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I'm writing this function that checks if a list of lists would be a valid sudoku puzzle. When I'm checking the lists for valid integers I'm getting unexpected results.

For example:

lst = [[1,2,3],[2,3,1],[4,2,1]]
for i in lst: 
  for v in i:
    print type(v)

<type 'int'>   #all the way through

for i in lst:
  for v in i:
    if v is int:
      print True

Prints nothing, and when I through in:

for i in lst:
  for v in i:
    if v is not int:
      print False

Prints all False? Not sure about what is going on, especially with the type showing they're integers.

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Is the orange in my hand the same thing as the concept of oranges? –  Karl Knechtel May 23 '12 at 7:19
    
I wish is in python worked this way. They should've used === for equivalence and is for isinstance. –  georg May 23 '12 at 7:45
    
@thg435 Really? How frequently do you write type checks, as against test for identity? –  Marcin May 23 '12 at 8:45
    
@Marcin: I don't use either very often. if param is int just sounds better to me than isinstance. –  georg May 23 '12 at 8:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Instead of saying

if v is int:

Which is asking if v is the actual type int

Say

if isinstance(v, int):

which says v is an instantiated int (or subclass)

Here is an example, first with an integer (or instantiated int)

>>> v = 17
>>> type(v)
<type 'int'>
>>> v is int
False
>>> isinstance(v, int)
True
>>> 

Next with a type

>>> v = int
>>> type(v)
<type 'type'>
>>> v is int
True
>>> isinstance(v, int)
False
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks Nick, just to be clear, this is because v is an instantiated 'type' int and not directly assigned? –  tijko May 23 '12 at 6:11
    
Yes v is an instantiated int, not the type int. I added an example to the answer to hopefully make things clearer –  Nick Craig-Wood May 23 '12 at 7:08
v is not int

is the same as saying, but a more readable version of

not v is int

is compares the references of each operand (not the types) to see if they are the same. Here is an example of that:

>>> x = (1,2,3)
>>> y = (1,2,3)
>>> x == y
True
>>> x is y
False

So v is int obviously evaluates to False. not turns False into True and the if statement prints.

Use isinstance(v, int) for the correct result.

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Very helpful, this is expanding on what Marcin had commented, correct? –  tijko May 23 '12 at 6:19
    
Yes, that's correct. –  jamylak May 23 '12 at 6:21

No integer is the same object as int. You want to use isintance.

You don't want to use type(v) == int, because that will evaluate to False if v is a subclass of int, which is in most cases not the desired behaviour at all; if you do really, really want that, do type(v) is int, because is is the expected style for comparison with a specific object (which is what a type is).

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The answers saying you should use isinstance are correct, but an alternative way to do it would be to use if type(v) == int.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you and your comment fit in nicely with the others explanation. –  tijko May 23 '12 at 6:24
    
isinstance does not do the same thing as type(v) == int. isinstance(v,t) will report True if type(v) evalutes to t or to any subclass of t. –  Marcin May 23 '12 at 8:48
    
@Marcin: I did not claim this was equivalent to isinstance, I said this was an alternative way to do what OP wanted to do. Subclasses are irrelevant in this context. –  Junuxx May 23 '12 at 9:20
    
@Junuxx Unless...unless...the example code in the question is not the only code OP will ever write. –  Marcin May 23 '12 at 9:24
    
@Marcin: Unless... unless there might be actual instances of subclasses of int in the data that should not pass, e.g., True and False. I'm not convinced. –  Junuxx May 23 '12 at 9:26

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