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I'm having a hard time understanding this piece of code.

#define TABLE  \
        STATE(STATE_1,    true) \
        STATE(STATE_2,    false) \
        STATE(STATE_3,    true) 


enum State_t
        {
        #define STATE( state, valid) state,
            TABLE
            #undef STATE
            NUM_STATES
        }

I know that State_t enum will have STATE_1, STATE_2 and STATE_3 and NUM_STATES=3, but I'm having a hard time understanding the mechanism of this. Could someone please kindly explain.

Also, now I want to define a duplicate state, for example:

#define TABLE  \
        STATE(STATE_1,    true) \
        STATE(STATE_2,    false) \
        STATE(STATE_3,    true) \
        STATE(STATE_2,    true) 

But this gives compiler errors because of redefinition of STATE_2. How can I make State_t enum still have State_t={STATE_1, STATE_2 , STATE_3} and if possible NUM_STATES=4, maybe using #ifndef. I'm not sure if this can be done but please share your ideas.

Thank you.

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7  
First of all you have an error in your #define TABLE, the last backslash should give you an error. Also, you have an extra #endif –  Joachim Pileborg May 23 '12 at 6:33
5  
wow that is an awful way to define a table. Whoever created that piece of code should be forbidden to write code again. –  BЈовић May 23 '12 at 6:36
    
@JoachimPileborg Thank you. Removed the slash. But which #endif is extra? –  madu May 23 '12 at 6:41
1  
What are the valid flags for? It seems to be discarding those. –  Paul Mitchell May 23 '12 at 6:50
1  
@Madu, as you can see from Roee Vagrel's answer below, the valid flags are not used, they're discarded. You ask why this an awful way to define a table? It seems like an very obfuscated way of just defining a simple enum. –  Paul Mitchell May 23 '12 at 7:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Some more answers to the following questions:

A.
The #define and #undef are "saying" where the define is valid. meaning, if you write "STATE(STATE_2, true)" after the #undef the PP will not replace it.

B.
the comma next to the state is what separate the enum entities.

C.
enums, unless specifically define otherwise, are giving the first entity the value 0 and increasing it by one for each value:

enum State_t
        {
            STATE_1, // = 0
            STATE_2, // = 1
            STATE_3, // = 2
            NUM_STATES // = 3
        }

The name of the entity is irrelevant for the value.

I think you are lacking the basics of C++ and you trying to understand something more complicated. try to look for a simple enum and #define examples.

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Thank you Roee. Now I got it. First time for me to encounter this mechanism, also including NUM_STATES at the end so it will have the number of entries in the enum. I need to look up how STATE( state, valid) state,TABLE works now. Thanks. –  madu May 23 '12 at 7:43

#define tell the pre-processor (PP) to replace things. (the define statements are removed)
so, starting with:

enum State_t
        {
            TABLE
            NUM_STATES
        }

The PP will replace the TABLE with it definition:

enum State_t
        {
            STATE(STATE_1,    true)
            STATE(STATE_2,    false)
            STATE(STATE_3,    true) 
            NUM_STATES
        }

Now the PP will replace every STATE with the STATE definition, resulting in:

enum State_t
        {
            STATE_1,
            STATE_2,
            STATE_3,
            NUM_STATES
        }

NOTE: the STATE define doesn't make use of the valid parameter.

regarding your second question, now I think you can see how it will end up if you add another STATE(STATE_2, true) to TABLE. but you can always add STATE(STATE_4, true) (-:

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Roee. But what is the use of #define and #undef. And also how does NUM_STATES get the value of 3? –  madu May 23 '12 at 7:07
    
Also I want to know the mechanism of extracting state:#define STATE( state, valid) state,. What does that comma next to state does? and is there a specific name for this mechanism? –  madu May 23 '12 at 7:09

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