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This code produces an error message, which I found surprising:

class Foo(object):
    custom = 1
    def __init__(self, custom=Foo.custom):
        self._custom = custom

x = Foo()

Can anyone provide enlightenment?

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4 Answers 4

It's Foo that isn't visible, because you're in the middle of building it. But since you're in the same scope as custom, you can just say custom rather than Foo.custom:

class Foo(object):
    custom = 1
    def __init__(self, mycustom=custom):
        self._custom = mycustom

But note that changing Foo.custom later on won't affect the value of custom that subsequently-created Foos see:

class Foo(object):
    custom = 1
    def __init__(self, mycustom=custom):
        self._custom = mycustom

one = Foo()
Foo.custom = 2
two = Foo()
print (two._custom)  # Prints 1

By using a sentinel default value instead, you can get what you want:

class Foo(object):
    custom = 1
    def __init__(self, mycustom=None):
        if mycustom is None:
            self._custom = Foo.custom
        else:
            self._custom = mycustom

one = Foo()
Foo.custom = 2
two = Foo()
print (two._custom)  # Prints 2
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Nice, except comparisons with None should always be done via is. –  Daniel Roseman Jul 1 '09 at 21:39
    
"Though that does mean that changing Foo.custom later on won't affect the value of custom that subsequently-created Foos see": Worth pointing out that it's always the case for functions that default values are created and bound only once, when the function is created, so even if it were possible to reference Foo.custom for a default value, it would still be the case that the default value wouldn't change if Foo.custom was changed. –  Miles Jul 1 '09 at 22:43
    
Why is it allowable to reference Foo.custom in the body of init but not in the initializer list? In both cases "we're in the middle of building it". –  rdm Jul 1 '09 at 22:46
1  
@rdm: When you run the body of init you're no longer building Foo. It's only when you call init that the reference to 'Foo.custom' in the function body actually tries to look up 'custom' in Foo. Whereas it's when you're defining init that the default parameters are looked up, as Miles points out in his comment. –  RichieHindle Jul 1 '09 at 22:52
    
@rdm: references to global variables are resolved only when the expression containing them is evaluated. Argument default values are evaluated when the function is created. The body of a function is evaluated when it is called. init is called when you create a Foo instance, after the Foo class has been created. –  Miles Jul 1 '09 at 23:38

What we do instead is the following

class Foo( object ):
    custom = 1
    def __init__( self, arg=None )
        self._custom = self.custom if arg is None else arg

This bypasses the confusing issue of whether or not the name Foo has been defined yet.

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Why should it be confusing? Before an instance is created, the class should be initialized. init is run when an instance is created, so class variables should be visible. –  rdm Jul 1 '09 at 22:47
    
@rdm: See Miles's comment to my answer. Default parameters are determined during the creation of the function (ie. during the creation of the class in this case), not when you call it. –  RichieHindle Jul 1 '09 at 22:53

The class body is executed before the class its self is defined, so default argument values can't reference the class. Just making custom the default (without class qualification) should work.

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I get the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  Line 1, in <module>
    class Foo(object):
  Line 3, in Foo
    def __init__(self, custom=Foo.custom):
NameError: name 'Foo' is not defined

This is because the name Foo is in the process of being defined as the __init__ function is defined, and is not fully available at that time.

The solution is to avoid using the name Foo in the function definition (I also renamed the custom paramter to acustom to distinguish it from Foo.custom):

class Foo(object):
    custom = 1
    def __init__(self, acustom=custom):
        self._custom = acustom
x = Foo()
print x._custom
share|improve this answer
    
But you know you can refer to Foo.custom in the body of init, not just in the initializer list. This strikes me as inconsistent. –  rdm Jul 1 '09 at 22:43
    
"I also renamed the custom paramter to acustom to distinguish it from Foo.custom": This is probably a good idea, but it's not strictly necessary, and in some situations in Python it's even an idiom to have them be the same (mostly with nested functions inside of a loop, e.g. lambda x=x:...) –  Miles Jul 1 '09 at 22:46

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