Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can check if a string equals to a given keyword with regular expressions. Here is an example:

Regex: /^hello$/
String: hello
Result: matches, as expected

Regex: /^goodbye$/
String: goodbye
Result: matches, as expected

Regex: /^bye$/
String: bye bye
Result: does not match, as expected

What I can't achieve is to check if a string is not equal to a keyword. Here are some examples of what I am trying to do:

Regex: ^(?!hello).*$
String: bye
Result: matches, as expected

Regex: ^(?!hello).*$
String: bye bye
Result: matches, as expected

Regex: ^(?!hello).*$
String: say hello
Result: matches, as expected

Regex: ^(?!hello).*$
String: hello you
Result: does not match, but should match because "hello you" is not equal to "hello"

I think I am close with ^(?!hello).*$ but need a hand on this. Here is another example:

Regex: ^(?!fresh\sfruits).*$
String: fresh fruits
Result: does not match, as expected

Regex: ^(?!fresh\sfruits).*$
String: lots of fresh fruits
Result: matches, as expected

Regex: ^(?!fresh\sfruits).*$
String: fresh fruits, love them.
Result: does not match, but should match

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use string comparison, rather than regex? –  nhahtdh May 23 '12 at 8:10
    
I'm guessing this is more out of curiosity and for learning rather than as a practical method. –  Tikhon Jelvis May 23 '12 at 8:11
    
Good point but the application I am working on needs set of rules defined in regular expressions. This is not curiosity or for learning, this is a real need :) –  matte May 23 '12 at 8:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let's just add the failing case to your expression:

^(hello.+|(?!hello).*)$

So the first bit matches hello followed by anything save the empty string. (I just finished an automata class and can't help but think of it as ε :P). The second bit matches anything not starting with hello.

That covers all the possible cases, I think.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tikhon, works perfect! –  matte May 23 '12 at 8:23

^(?!hello$) (drop the .*)

(...fixed lookbehind/ahead confusion)

share|improve this answer
    
For me in JavaScript /(?!^hello)$/.test("hello") returns true. In fact, it seems to return true for every string. –  Tikhon Jelvis May 23 '12 at 8:09
    
(?!^hello)$ does not match bye. The regex should match if the string is not equal to a keyword. –  matte May 23 '12 at 8:09
    
Aha, was going out the door as I typed it, mixed up some lookahead/behind. Fixed now. –  Wrikken May 23 '12 at 9:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.