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Is there a shortcut for three code hexcodes, example, black can be wrote two ways

.black{color:#000}
.black{color:#000000}

Can #DBDBDB this be wrote shorter? As #DBD does not work.

Also what is faster, does it matter, I notice Firebug spits colors and some other vars in case sensitive format. Does it matter? Is it faster to have everything lowercase so the browser and user can load and render faster?

.webform{color:#dbdbdb}
.WebForm{color:#DBDBDB}
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Both cases will have negligable differences in performance; every colour format is parsed into an internal memory structure by the browser anyway. Tools like Firebug read this and output a re-formatted version of that data. #DBD expands to #DDBBDD which is why it might not be giving the results you expect. –  Bojangles May 23 '12 at 8:16
    
Have you turned off your java script? –  Luka Rahne May 23 '12 at 8:17
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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Can #DBDBDB this be wrote shorter? As #DBD does not work.

No. The only things shorter than a 6-hex colour codes are 3-hex codes (which only work for XXYYZZ colours) and (some) named colours (and there isn't one that matches #DBDBDB).

Also what is faster

Stop micro-optimising. If there is a difference it won't be a significant one and will probably vary from browser to browser.

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If you consider things like Mobile devices "micro-optimising" is a small piece of the pie which will equate to overall improvement. Especially if 100kb CSS file becomes 35kb. Thanks for the comments. –  TheBlackBenzKid May 23 '12 at 8:54
    
A capital letter takes up the same number of bytes as a lower case letter. –  Quentin May 23 '12 at 8:55
    
OK. That is what I wanted to know - if example, The Webkit or browser engines covert this - it does not matter know as your answer is sufficient and the reduction must come from #000000 into #000 and the like –  TheBlackBenzKid May 23 '12 at 8:59
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If you're worried about the size of your CSS, use a minifier. Most of these will shorten colours where possible. There's almost never a reason for a human to think about micro-optimisations on this level. "About 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil." –  RichardTowers May 23 '12 at 15:33
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The simple answer is it makes no perceivable difference. This is a classic case of over-thinking optimisation.

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There are actually lots of ways of specifying black:

.black{color:#000} 
.black{color:#000000}
.black{color:black;}
.black{color:rgb(255,0,0);}

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/syndata.html#color-units

I would be very surprised if there were any measurable speed difference between the accuracies in any browser.

#DBDBDB cannot be written more compactly, it's equivalent to: rgb(219,219,219). In the shorter notation the closest you could come would be #DDD which is equivalent to rgb(221,221,221).

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Thanks for the information. –  TheBlackBenzKid May 23 '12 at 8:54
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In the three letter abbreviations each letter is duplicated, so #DBD becomes #DDBBDD. You can't shorten codes like #DBDBDB.

There is no performance difference between uppercase and lowercase letters.

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#DBDBDB can not be written shorter.

There is no difference in speed.

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Lowercase and uppercase have no difference in performance, but it's worth mentioning that shorthand hexadecimal colors could reduce css file size to some tiny extent, which helps save bandwidth more or less.

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