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Some changes were made in git between hash A and hash B (the branch latest is in Z - thousands of commits later). I'd like to have the HEAD (my local one) point to hash A and have in my working directory all changes that were made between A and B.

Why? Because git diff is inconvenient and I'd rather work with the diff tool my IDE (IntelliJ IDEA) has. But for this I need to convince the IDE that I have changed files - hence the request.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I actually found a way:

git checkout <hash A>
git diff –patch <hash A> <hash B> > patch.patch
patch –p1 –N < patch.patch

A coworker also told me that I could've used

git checkout <hash A>
git merge --squash <hash B>

instead - but I didn't test it yet.

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I thought --squash had to do with combining multiple commits into a single one? That's doesn't exactly seem to have the same intention. –  n00neimp0rtant Jan 23 at 15:31
    
I actually wanted these squashed - same as if getting and applying a patch file for the diff between the two revisions. –  Ran Biron Apr 30 at 7:34
    
Okay, I see what you mean. I use git merge --squash all the time, but I usually squash changes between branches (not commits), and I never attempt to squash while having checked out anything other than HEAD. Just to avoid confusion, I like break out both the commit to be squashed and the commit to squash into out to their own branches. –  n00neimp0rtant Apr 30 at 14:01
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You could:

  • git clone your local repo and reset it to hashB (see "Git clone particular version of remote repository")
  • git reset hashA within your local repo
  • empty its content and replace it: Git Plugin within IDEA will detect all the files added, missing or modified compared to current HEAD.
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