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I'm using nose 1.1.2 to write tests for a Python project. There is this assert_raises function that happens to be mentioned in the documentation but I can't find it anywhere.

It should be a shorthand for something like this:

value_error_raised = False
try:
    do_something_that_should_raise_value_error()
except ValueError:
    value_error_raised = True
assert value_error_raised

type_error_raised = False
try:
    do_something_else_that_should_raise_type_error()
except TypeError:
    type_error_raised = True
assert type_error_raised

that would become:

assert_raises(ValueError,
              do_something_that_should_raise_value_error)

assert_raises(TypeError,
              do_something_else_that_should_raise_type_error)

I already searched the source code and the only mention I found was in the tools.py module, inside the raises documentation:

If you want to test many assertions about exceptions in a single test, you may want to use assert_raises instead.

Was this function removed from nose? If so, could someone help me understand why?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted
>>> from nose.tools import assert_raises
>>> assert_raises
<bound method Dummy.assertRaises of <nose.tools.Dummy testMethod=nop>>
>>> import nose
>>> nose.__version__
'1.1.2'

I personally use the unittest2.TestCase classes with nosetests, and use self.assertRaises.

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Ok, that works! Thanks! I just realized that the reason it is not explicitly defined on nose.tools is that because it is a workaround through unittest.TestCase assertRaise implementation. Consequently eclipse keep reporting a import error on from nose.tools import assert_raises. –  tbellardi May 23 '12 at 9:35
    
it is not just that where PyDev is wrong, in a larger project using Jython I remember having to add exceptions for more than a hundred identifiers... –  Antti Haapala May 23 '12 at 12:33

Use the @raises(*exceptions) decorator on your test function.

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4  
That verifies if one of the exceptions was raised, so I would need a test function for each expected error raised. If I want a single test function to verify many exceptions raised, that does not help me. –  tbellardi May 23 '12 at 8:55

This answer applies to the reason why you cannot find info about assert_raises.

From nose documentation:

The nose.tools module provides […] all of the same assertX methods found in unittest.TestCase (only spelled in PEP 8 fashion, so assert_equal rather than assertEqual)

Here are PEP 8's suggested function naming and list of assertX methods in Python's base documentation.

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