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How can I automate the following with a bash shell script using word designators and word modifiers or something similar?

root@server:/tmp# wget -q http://download.zeromq.org/zeromq-2.2.0.tar.gz
root@server:/tmp# tar -xzf !$:t
tar -xzf zeromq-2.2.0.tar.gz
root@server:/tmp# cd !$:r:r
cd zeromq-2.2.0
root@server:/tmp/zeromq-2.2.0#

When I try something like the below I get errors because word designators and word modifiers don't appear to work the same way in bash scripts as they do in a shell:

Bash Shell Script Example 1:

#!/usr/bin/env bash
wget -q http://download.zeromq.org/zeromq-2.2.0.tar.gz && tar -xzf !$:t && cd !$:r:r

root@server:/tmp# ./install.sh 
tar (child): Cannot connect to !$: resolve failed

gzip: stdin: unexpected end of file
tar: Child returned status 128
tar: Error is not recoverable: exiting now

Bash Shell Script Example 2:

#!/usr/bin/env bash
wget -q http://download.zeromq.org/zeromq-2.2.0.tar.gz
tar -xzf !$:t
cd !$:r:r

root@server:/tmp# ./install.sh 
tar (child): Cannot connect to !$: resolve failed

gzip: stdin: unexpected end of file
tar: Child returned status 128
tar: Error is not recoverable: exiting now
./install.sh: line 11: cd: !$:r:r: No such file or directory
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

History substitution works at the command line. In a script, you can use parameter expansion.

#!/usr/bin/env bash
url=http://download.zeromq.org/zeromq-2.2.0.tar.gz
wget -q "$url"
tarfile=${url##*/}        # strip off the part before the last slash
tar -xzf "$tarfile"
dir=${tarfile%.tar.gz}    # strip off ".tar.gz"
cd "$dir"
share|improve this answer

If the example provided is the only issue you are trying to resolve perhaps the following can help:

version="2.2.0"
wget -q http://download.zeromq.org/zeromq-${version}.tar.gz
tar -xzf zeromq-${version}.tar.gz
cd zeromq-${version}

In a bash script version could be the first option passed to the script:

version=$1

This does not contain error handling and so on but should get you started.

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