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My question is kind of weird, lets say I have a class inheriting from UITableViewCell called GenericTableViewCell and some more classes inheriting from GenericTableViewCell. I want to be able to pass an argument to the GenericTableViewCell init method that will tell me which subclass of GenericTableViewCell should init this TableViewCell as. Heres what I thought of but I know that it will fail because it has a recursive loop in it.

@implementation GenericTableViewCell

- (id)initWithStyle:(UITableViewCellStyle)style reuseIdentifier:(NSString *)reuseIdentifier cellIdentifier: (CellIdentifier *) identifier
{
    self = [super initWithStyle:style reuseIdentifier:reuseIdentifier];
    if (self) {
        if ([identifier class] == [FirstIdentifier class]){
            self = [[FirstTableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:style reuseIdentifier:reuseIdentifier];
        }
        /// more else statements to check for other identifier cases
    }
    return self;
}

@end

Is there any way to do this? Or should I just check the identifier outside of the init function and by that decide which cell do I declare?

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When I call init from NSObject I suppose it will return me NSObject instance, and not for example NSNumber. This is really weird thing.. –  beryllium May 23 '12 at 9:11
1  
Why would you want this? To know what cellIdentifier to send along, you probably already have some if/else or switch statement somewhere to check that. Why not just init the correct table view class at that moment. –  Rick van der Linde May 23 '12 at 9:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do this. It's a pattern you sometimes come across called a class cluster. If you are not using ARC, you must release the original value of self to stop a memory leak.

However, I would not do this. I would create a factory method in GenericTableViewCell.

+(GenericTableViewCell*) cellWithStyle: (UITableViewCellStyle)style 
                       reuseIdentifier: (NSString *)reuseIdentifier 
                        cellIdentifier: (CellIdentifier *) identifier
{
    GenericTableViewCell* ret = nil;

    if ([identifier class] == [FirstIdentifier class])
    {
        ret = [[FirstTableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:style reuseIdentifier:reuseIdentifier];
    }
    else 
    {
        // ....
    }
    return [ret autorelease];
}

You can eliminate the if statement by adding a method to CellIdentifier and overriding it in subclasseslike this:

// in CellIdentifier.m

-(id) classForCell
{
    return [GenericTableViewCell class];
} 

// in FirstIdentifier.m

-(id) classForCell
{
    return [FirstTableViewCell class];
}

Then your factory method becomes

+(GenericTableViewCell*) cellWithStyle: (UITableViewCellStyle)style 
                       reuseIdentifier: (NSString *)reuseIdentifier 
                        cellIdentifier: (CellIdentifier *) identifier
{
    return [[[[identifier classForCell] alloc] initWithStyle:style 
                                             reuseIdentifier:reuseIdentifier] autorelease];
}
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Thank you very much that was helpful to me. My bad for forgetting the factory pattern I guess. –  Nadavrbn May 23 '12 at 11:12

The thing you should implement is called class cluster pattern. In your situation you shouldn't call initWithStyle:reuseIdentifier: on a subclass rather than in subclass' initializer:

In GenericTableViewCell:

- (id)initWithCustomIdentifier:(NSString *identifier) {
    Class cellClass = NSClassFromString(identifier);

    if (!cellClass) {
        cellClass = [MyStandardTableViewCell class];
    }
    self = [[cellClass alloc] init];

    return self;
}

In MyStandardTableViewCell (or any other subclass of GenericTableViewCell:

- (id)init {
    self = [super initWithStyle:someStyle reuseIdentifier:NSStringFromClass([self class])];

    if (!self) return nil;

    // do extra setup here
    return self;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that's a good solution but JeremyP's solution was more flexible in my situation. –  Nadavrbn May 23 '12 at 9:47

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