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This is something that's bugged me for awhile now:

def test (*args, **kwargs):
    print target

test(foo='bar', target='baz')

I would presume that target='test' in the aFunc call at the bottom would end up in kwargs (and it does), and I would also presume that **would unpack kwargs in the function call, so target would exist as a keyword argument inside of aFunc. It doesn't. I know that it comes in as a dict, but I need to have that dict unpack in the argument list. Is this possible? In short, is there any way to have *args and **kwargs disappear and have the actual args and kwargs go into the call?

Edit: I threw together a case where unpacking of *args and **kwargs might help:

Let's say I have a function that prints a list:

def printList (inputList=None):
    print inputList

I want to be able to pass no list and have a default list supplied:

def ensureList (listFunc):
    def wrapper (inputList=None):
        listFunc(inputList=inputList or ['a','default','list'])
    return wrapper

@ensureList
def printList (inputList=None):
    print inputList

Now I want to get a bit more complicated with a list repeater:

@ensureList
def repeatList (inputList=None):
    print inputList*2

That works fine. But now I want variable repeating:

@ensureList
def repeatList (times, inputList=None):
    print inputList*times

Now you would be able to say:

repeatList(5)

It would generate the default list and repeat it 5 times.

This fails, of course, because wrapper can't handle the times argument. I could of course do this:

@ensureList
def repeatList (inputList=None, times=1)

But then I always have to do this:

repeatList(times=5)

And maybe in some cases I want to enforce supplying a value, so a non-keyword arg makes sense.

When I first encountered problems like this last year, I thought a simple solution would be to remove the requirements on the wrapper:

def ensureList (listFunc):
    "info here re: operating on/requiring an inputList keyword arg"
    def wrapper (*args, **kwargs):
        listFunc(inputList=inputList or ['a','default','list'])
    return wrapper

That doesn't work, though. This is why I'd like to have args and kwargs actually expand, or I'd like to have a way to do the expansion. Then whatever args and kwargs I supply, they actually fill in the arguments, and not a list and a dict. The documentation in the wrapper would explain requirements. If you pass in inputList, it would actually go in, and inputList in the call back to repeatList from the wrapper would be valid. If you didn't pass in inputList, it would create it in the call back to repeatList with a default list. If your function didn't care, but used *kwargs, it would just gracefully accept it without issue.

Apologies if any of the above is wrong (beyond the general concept). I typed it out in here, untested, and it's very late.

share|improve this question
6  
"I need to have that dict unpack in the argument list." – I cannot imagine any reason why you would need this. Could you please enlighten me? –  Sven Marnach May 23 '12 at 10:06
5  
If you know which options you're going to get, then why use **kwargs at all? –  larsmans May 23 '12 at 10:06
    
How to better go about doing what? You don't know what I'm doing. I just asked if I could unpack the list and dict inside the arguments. And it isn't complaining. It's just stating a fact. This site has a very difficult crowd. I ask straightforward questions - is it possible to do this? with a code example - and I always am met with people asking "Why on earth would you ever want to do that?" Maybe I don't. I just want to know if I can. –  Gary Fixler May 23 '12 at 10:15
3  
@GaryFixler: what you trying to achieve in the question makes no sense, so it's quite natural that people point that out. –  vartec May 23 '12 at 10:19
    
@GaryFixler That's because Python code is meant to be readable and there is usually one good way of doing things. If you want to 'just get things done' like you have explained, you should probably look at perl. –  jamylak May 23 '12 at 10:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The answer to "why doesn't ** unpack kwargs in function calls?" is: Because it's a bad idea, the person who develop a function does not want local variable to just appear depending on the call arguments.

So, this is not how it's working and you surely do not want python to behave like that.

To access the target variable in the function, you can either use:

def test(target='<default-value>', *args, **kwargs):
    print target

or

def test(*args, **kwargs):
    target = kwargs.get('target', '<default-value>')
    print target

However, if you want a hack (educational usage only) to unpack **kwargs, you can try that:

def test(*args, **kwargs):
    for i in kwargs:
        exec('%s = %s' % (i, repr(kwargs[i])))
    print target
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for answering the question. It appears it is not possible. –  Gary Fixler May 23 '12 at 10:19
3  
It is possible, it's just a Bad Idea, like it is 99% of the time someone thinks they want to create variable names dynamically. –  Wooble May 23 '12 at 10:21
    
Good answer, but what do you mean by "*args can't be automatically unpacked because there is no variable name associated." –  detly May 23 '12 at 10:21
    
Thanks for the update, math. I definitely don't want to do that :) –  Gary Fixler May 23 '12 at 10:31
1  
+1 for giving an answer instead of lecturing him. –  georg May 23 '12 at 10:57

The obvious way for this particular case is

def test(foo=None, target=None):
    print target

test(foo='bar', target='baz')

If you want to access a parameter inside a function by name, name it explicitly in the argument list.

share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't answer the question. –  Gary Fixler May 23 '12 at 10:16

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