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I was wondering: what would be the best way to fit an attribute to a class which is part of a large inheritance structure. I wanted to make an abstract static method which each class would override but after a quick google that doesn't seem to work. Any suggestions?

I could make it an instance method but it really is a class level specification.

Thanks in advance.

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As you've found, static polymorphism doesn't exist in Java. What is the overall goal? –  Oli Charlesworth May 23 '12 at 10:26
    
Can you explain in more detail what you want to do with this static method? Maybe we can find an alternative solution. –  Tudor May 23 '12 at 10:26
    
To be more specific: we're dealing with a boolean value which i need to be able to query for an object of each class specifically. So I think i answered my own question: I should make it an instance method. –  Michiel Ariens May 23 '12 at 10:27
    
just for each object of the same class the value is the same –  Michiel Ariens May 23 '12 at 10:27
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would suggest you create an abstract method, just as you have thought of, and let this method be implemented in terms of static variables in each class.

abstract class Base {
    abstract String getValue();
}

class A extends Base {

    static String aValue = "From A";

    String getValue() {
        return aValue;
    }
}

class B extends A {

    static String bValue = "From B";

    String getValue() {
        return bValue;
    }
}

It requires a little bit more boiler plate in each class, than just a field declaration, but I believe it is hard to do anything about that.

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Ah ok, thanks! I'll go for that. I'd +1 you but i just joined and have no rep. –  Michiel Ariens May 23 '12 at 10:30
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