Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Coming from a non-Java background, I find myself writing a lot of View classes with extensive functionality (in an effort to be portable), that don't necessarily fit nicely into the Android FW setup as far as maintenance - for example, I might have a widget that does something on a interval that I want to stop and clean up when an Activity is paused/stopped/destroyed. Generally I can manage this by just calling a public method on the widget from the containing Activity, but A) sometimes this gets pretty deep, and having to create a public method to access a child in every parent can get ugly, and B) requires extra (uneeded?) attention.

I'm considering using an approach like a global delegate to manage this kind of thing, but have read a lot of warnings about this sort of approach - would something like the class that follows have any inherent flaws that I might be missing?

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.HashSet;

public class ActiveRegistry {

    private static final ActiveRegistry instance = new ActiveRegistry();
    public static ActiveRegistry getInstance(){
        return instance;
    }

    private HashMap<String, HashSet<Runnable>> registry = new HashMap<String, HashSet<Runnable>>();
    private ActiveRegistry(){

    }

    public void register(String key, Runnable runnable){
        if(!registry.containsKey(key)){
            HashSet<Runnable> list = new HashSet<Runnable>();
            registry.put(key, list);
        }
        HashSet<Runnable> list = registry.get(key);
        list.add(runnable);
    }

    public void execute(String key){
        if(registry.containsKey(key)){
            HashSet<Runnable> list = registry.get(key);
            for(Runnable runnable : list){
                runnable.run();
            }
        }
    }
}

Use might be something like...

  1. A View has something that needs to be cleaned up. On instantiation, register it... ActiveRegistry.getInstance().register("paused", someRunnableThatCleansUpStuff)
  2. Extend Activity so that onPause calls ActiveRegistry.getInstance().execute("paused");
share|improve this question
    
"I might have a widget that does something on a interval" -- AFAIAC, that's a mistake right there. Your controller (fragment, or activity if no fragments) does something on an interval; your view does not. "have any inherent flaws that I might be missing?" -- you mean, besides the horrible memory leaks? –  CommonsWare May 23 '12 at 11:43
1  
@CommonsWare re: widgets with extended functionality... fragments aren't available until 3.0, right? what if you had a widget that just updated it's text every X seconds, that was 5 or 6 deep in the view heirarchy - what would be the preferred approach? seems like activities would get pretty bloated if all behavior had to be assigned there, no? for one timer obviously it's not much to handle, but what about cases where you have dozens of things like this? can you elaborate on the memory leak comment? what specifically about this would cause memory leaks, and how could it be avoided? thx –  Big MoMo May 23 '12 at 11:52
1  
"fragments aren't available until 3.0, right?" -- the Android Support package has a fragments implementation that works back to 1.6. "if you had a widget that just updated it's text every X seconds, that was 5 or 6 deep in the view heirarchy - what would be the preferred approach?" -- have the controller tell the view to update. "seems like activities would get pretty bloated if all behavior had to be assigned there, no?" -- you are welcome to your opinion. "but what about cases where you have dozens of things like this?" -- all the more reason to centralize the logic in the controller. –  CommonsWare May 23 '12 at 12:21
1  
"what specifically about this would cause memory leaks" -- the fact that you are putting things in a static collection and never removing them. Anything that those Runnables refer to can never be garbage collected, such as your widgets, and the activities the widgets refer to, etc. –  CommonsWare May 23 '12 at 12:24
    
@CommonsWare setting aside the role of controllers, and specifically regarding the memory leaks - would clearing the Sets (or removing the reference to the Set from the Map) fix that? –  Big MoMo May 23 '12 at 12:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are doing way more work than you need to. Using Fragments (from the support package, if you want to ensure backwards compatibility with older versions of android), will make your life a whole lot easier. Each fragment is embedded in an activity and has a lifecycle that is directly linked with its host activity's lifecycle. Using them should significantly reduce the complexity of your code, as most of what you are currently worrying about will be managed by the system instead.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.