Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a <Border>inside that I have an <Image> and a <Textblock>, and I am trying to change the textblock text on Mouseleftbutton down, since there is some more lengthy operation inside this click event, text of text block doesn't change till this operation get completed.

also I tried Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(), but no success.

Here is my Code :

<Border x:Name="btnReadMe" Grid.Row="0" Style="{StaticResource BorderStyle1}" MouseLeftButtonDown="btnReadMe_MouseLeftButtonDown" MouseLeftButtonUp="btnReadMe_MouseLeftButtonUp" >
    <Border.Background>
        <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0.5,0" EndPoint="0.5,1">
            <GradientStop Color="#46c746" Offset="0"/>
            <GradientStop Color="#129312" Offset="1"/>
        </LinearGradientBrush>
    </Border.Background>
    <Grid>
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="3*"/>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="6*"/>
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Image Grid.Column="0" Source="/CareFamily.AtHome;component/Resources/read_message-read_it.png" Margin="5,15" >
            <Image.RenderTransform>
                <ScaleTransform ScaleX="1" ScaleY="1"/>
            </Image.RenderTransform>
        </Image>
        <StackPanel Grid.Column="1" Margin="0,10,0,10"  VerticalAlignment="Center">
            <TextBlock Name="tbReadToMe" Text="Read to Me" Style="{StaticResource TextBlockStyle1}" Margin="0,0,0,0"  />
        </StackPanel>
    </Grid>
</Border>

SpVoice voice;
private void btnReadMe_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    if (voice == null)
        voice = new SpVoice();


    string readMessageState = tbReadToMe.Text;
    switch (readMessageState)
    {
        case "Read to Me":
            {
                tbReadToMe.Text = "Pause";
                break;
            }

        case "Pause":
            {
                tbReadToMe.Text = "Resume";
                voice.Pause();
                break;
            }

        case "Resume":
            {
                tbReadToMe.Text = "Pause";
                voice.Resume();
                break;
            }
        default:
            {
                tbReadToMe.Text = "Read to Me";
                break;
            }
    }


    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Msg.Subject))
    {
        voice.Speak(Msg.Subject, SpeechVoiceSpeakFlags.SVSFDefault);
    }
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Msg.Body))
    {
        voice.Speak(Msg.Body, SpeechVoiceSpeakFlags.SVSFDefault); // Length operation
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you invoking the lengthy operation on a separate thread? If not, it's being run on the UI thread and invoking the Text change on the Dispatcher won't do anything since it is waiting for the lengthy operation to finish. Seeing some of the secondary operation will help. Also, you may want to look into the BackgroundWorker class and its ProgressChanged event. –  Christopher Jones May 23 '12 at 11:52
    
I forgot to look at your acceptance rate (40%) before I went to the trouble of answering your question and creating a working sample. If you can't be bothered to accept an answer, why should we answer your questions? –  Chris Bennet May 25 '12 at 15:07

3 Answers 3

The reason Dispatcher.BeginInvoke() didn't help is because even though it operates asycnronously, it still does it on the main/UI thread. Do your lengthy operation on a background thread using the BackgroundWorkerThread class.

I worked up a little sample to demonstrate:

Window1.xaml:

<Window x:Class="BackgroundWorkerExample.Window1"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="663">
<Grid>
    <TextBox PreviewMouseDown="textBox1_PreviewMouseDown" Height="38" Margin="24,34,26,0" Name="textBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" FontSize="24">
        The quick Velociraptor jumped over the torpid tapir.
    </TextBox>
</Grid>

Window1.xaml.cs:

using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System;

namespace BackgroundWorkerExample
{
    public partial class Window1 : Window
    {
        public Window1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }


        void _asyncSpeakerThread_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            // Change color of text to Red to indicate Start of operation
            this.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() =>  { textBox1.Foreground = Brushes.Red; }));

            string text = e.Argument as string;
            //voice.Speak(text, SpeechVoiceSpeakFlags.SVSFDefault); // Lengthy operation 
            Thread.Sleep(1000); // Simulate lengthy operation

            // Change color of text to Black to indicate End of operation
            this.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => { textBox1.Foreground = Brushes.Black; }));
        }

        private void textBox1_PreviewMouseDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
        {
            BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();

            bw.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(_asyncSpeakerThread_DoWork);
            string workerArgument = textBox1.Text;
            bw.RunWorkerAsync(workerArgument);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Execute your lengthy operation on a Thread and use the

Dispatcher

to update the UI accordingly.

Example Code:

var opThread = new Thread(delegate()
{
    //your lengthy operation

    tbReadToMe.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(delegate
    {
        tbReadToMe.Text = "Pause";
    }));

    //your lengthy operation

    tbReadToMe.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(delegate
    {
        tbReadToMe.Text = "etc...";
    }));
});

opThread.Start();
share|improve this answer
    
no no success...same I putted the lengthy operation part in Dispatcher.BeginInvoke... –  BreakHead May 23 '12 at 12:17
    
let us see your code and see my update... –  animaonline May 23 '12 at 12:23

Use an Application.DoEvents() before your "lengthy" operation!

share|improve this answer
    
there is no Applicaion.DoEvents() in my WPF application... –  BreakHead May 23 '12 at 12:16
    
that is just wrong, System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents() should not be used for that. The lengthy operation should not run on the main thread. It will probably work, but one should avoid doing that. –  animaonline May 23 '12 at 12:26
    
That is the choice of the coder! I was not sure if there was a Application.DoEvents() in wpf. So Sorry! And My answer will be using BackgroundWorker to use for your work.It is better than using MultiThreading! –  Writwick May 23 '12 at 12:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.