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I have the following class structure:

public abstract class Generic<T extends SuperClass>

public class SuperGeneric<T extends SuperClass & SomeInterface> 
    extends Generic<T>

Now I want to make an instance of SuperGeneric covering all possible classes. I tried it like this:

Generic<? extends SuperClass & SomeInterface> myGeneric 
    = new SuperGeneric<? extends SuperClass & SomeInterface>();

Now this doesn't seem to work. On Generic it gives the following error: Incorrect number of arguments for type Generic<T>; it cannot be parameterized with arguments <? extends SuperClass, SomeInterface>.

And on the new SuperGeneric I get a similar error: Incorrect number of arguments for type SuperGeneric<T>; it cannot be parameterized with arguments <? extends SuperClass, SomeInterface>.

Any idea how to correctly create instances of this SuperGeneric?

The idea is that I have 2 different classes that satisfy the extends SuperClass & SomeInterface condition but those cannot be generalized by one type.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you want to instantiate a generic class, you need to provide the concrete type. You said there are two classes that fulfill the constraint. Say these are Type1 and Type2.

Then you should be able to do:

Generic<Type1> myGeneric1 = new SuperGeneric<Type1>();

and

Generic<Type2> myGeneric2 = new SuperGeneric<Type2>();

The wildcards are used only for declaration. They mean: You can put any type here (that fulfills the given constraints)

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So where are wildcards used then? In method arguments and return-types? –  Steven Roose May 23 '12 at 12:23
    
@stevenroose see my last sentence –  hage May 23 '12 at 12:24
    
I'm sorry, oke, thanks! –  Steven Roose May 23 '12 at 12:25

When you instantiate you need to provide a type for the compiler to fill in.

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So where are wildcards used then? In method arguments and return-types? –  Steven Roose May 23 '12 at 12:21
    
The wildcards describe what T can be. But you actually need to provide something for T. –  nsfyn55 May 23 '12 at 12:24
    
You are conflating Class Literals and other Generics features. –  nsfyn55 May 23 '12 at 12:26
    
docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/wildcards.html - This is the oracle tutorial –  nsfyn55 May 23 '12 at 12:28
    
@nsfyn55 I find Java syntax confusing too. Whereas in C# you put the type constraints on separate clause(in where); in Java you put the type constraint declaration inside the generics declaration (Generic<T extends ClassNameHere>), hence your confusion on how to instantiate it. Having said that, when you instantiate(be it Java or C#), they are very simple, same syntax(i.e. Generic<SomeClass> x = new SuperGeneric<SomeClass>()), see my comparison at anicehumble.com/2012/05/… –  Michael Buen May 23 '12 at 12:43

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