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I'm trying to understand a bit more of some CSS coding. I've borrowed a navigation bar. The HTML code is like this:

      <ul>
        <li>
        <a href="">Business</a>
            <ul> 
            <li><a href="#">sub menu item 1</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">sub menu item 2</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>

The CSS:

   ul li 
   {
   display: block;
   position: relative;
   float: left;
   font-size:12px;
   top:15px;
   }

   li ul { display: none; }

   #navigation ul
   {margin:0px; padding:0px;}


   ul li a 
   {
   display:block;
   text-decoration: none;
   color: white;
   padding: 20px 30px 20px 15px;
   }

   ul li a:hover 
   { 
   background: #F89623;
   }

   /*submenu position*/
   li:hover ul 
   {
   display:block;
   position:absolute;
   left: -30px;
   top:51px;
   }

   li:hover a 
   { 
   background: #F89623;
   }

   /*Background when you mouseover subitems*/
   li:hover li a:hover 
   { 
   background: #FFDEB0;
   }

   /*top nav only*/
  #navigation > ul > li > a {
  font-size: 16px;
  border-top-left-radius:10px;
  border-top-right-radius:10px;
  }

I don't understand some of the display tags. What does li ul { display: none; } do?

Also display: block; what does this do in my code (above)?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

CSS display:none means hide element; display:block means show element.

Take a look at descendant selectors - http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/selector.html#descendant-selectors

In your case,

 li ul { display: none; }

means that those ULs that are descendants of LIs will not be shown (display:none vs. display:block);

In other words,

<ul id='parentUL'>
   <li id='childLI'>
      <ul id='childUL'>
      </ul>
   </li>
</ul>

childUL will not be shown based on this CSS.

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Clarification: display:block; does not mean "show element". It means "display as block element". In this particular case, your statement is true, but if the element is naturally inline, table or something else, it might mess things up if you simply use display:block; to toggle visibility. –  Nix May 23 '12 at 13:01

li ul { display: none; } will Hide the ul list which is defined under li tag.

li:hover ul { display:block; .. } this will show hidden ul list block defined under li tag

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li ul { display: none; }

Hides ul tags inside an li tag.

display: block;

This will display like a div or paragraph. (It will make it visible)

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Not a paragraph, they are inline elements. –  Undefined May 23 '12 at 12:30
    
display: block elements are not inline. For inline you use display: inline. –  nunespascal May 23 '12 at 12:37
    
Yes exactly. A div is a block level element. A paragraph is an inline element. By setting display block it will not display like a normal paragraph. –  Undefined May 23 '12 at 13:41

It simply toggles between the display modes — how the element should behave on the page. As you might have guessed, none means it will not display at all. The two other most common display types are inline and block.

Inline elements are elements such as <a>, <span> or <img>. It will position itself on the same line as the previous content.

Block elements are elements such as <div> or <h1>. It will position itself on a new line, and generally fill the entire width of the container. Block elements can also be manipulated with a padding, border, margin etc. (the box model).

There are lots of other display modes, such as table or inline-block. I'd advice you to read up on display modes. Here's a good ressource to get you started: http://www.quirksmode.org/css/display.html

EDIT:
I know <img> is technically not a pure inline element. It does display in-line, but unlike the traditional inline elements, it may have some block attributes, such as width or height. In reality it might be more line a inline-block element, but that's a discussion for another day. ;)

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