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At the moment I have a list of 1million integers, and I check each integer against a blacklist of 2000 integers. This is taking about 2 minutes.

for(int i = 0; i< MillionIntegerList.Length ; i++)
{
    for(int blacklisted = 0; blacklisted < TwoThousandIntegerList.Length ; blacklisted++)
        if(i==blacklisted)
            i = 0; //Zero is a sentinel value 
}

This makes 2,000,000,000 iterations(loops) altogether. Is there a better way Im not seeing? thanks

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2  
Is either list sorted? –  Daniel Renshaw May 23 '12 at 12:44
    
Actually the million integer list is sorted, the blacklisted is not –  theIrishUser May 23 '12 at 12:49
    
But the cost of sorting the blacklist nothing compared to the cost of what you want to do. –  Thomash May 23 '12 at 13:11
    
Does C# not have a built-in/easy way to do a binary search? Because the larger list is already sorted, that could easily be faster than Jon Skeet's answer, depending on the complexity of the hash function used. –  Izkata May 23 '12 at 14:41
2  
Don't forget, the code won't actually work the way you posted it (Cannot assign to 'i' because it is a 'foreach iteration variable'). –  jnylen May 23 '12 at 18:53
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8 Answers

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Three options now - the first two are more general, in that they don't rely on MillionIntegerList being sorted (which wasn't originally specified). The third is preferable in the case where the large list is already sorted.

Option 1

Yes, there's definitely a better way of doing it, using LINQ:

var common = MillionIntegerList.Intersect(TwoThousandIntegerList).ToList();

That will internally use a HashSet<int> built via the TwoThousandIntegerList, then look up each element of MillionIntegerList within it - which will be much more efficient than going through the whole of TwoThousandIntegerList each time.

If you only want the non-blacklisted ones, you need:

var valid = MillionIntegerList.Except(TwoThousandIntegerList).ToList();

Note that if you only need to iterate over the results once, you should remove the ToList call - I've included it to materialize the results so they can be examined multiple times cheaply. If you're just iterating, the return value of Intersect or Except will just stream the results, making it much cheaper in terms of memory usage.

Option 2

If you don't want to rely on the implementation details of LINQ to Objects but you still want a hash-based approach:

var hashSet = new HashSet<int>(TwoThousandIntegerList);
hashSet.IntersectWith(MillionIntegerList);
// Now use hashSet

Option 3

The approach of using the fact that the large list is sorted would definitely be useful.

Assuming you don't mind sorting the blacklisted list first as well, you could write a streaming (and general purpose) implementation like this (untested):

// Note: to use this, you'd need to make sure that *both* sequences are sorted.
// You could either sort TwoThousandIntegerList in place, or use LINQ's OrderBy
// method.

public IEnumerable<T> SortedIntersect<T>(this IEnumerable<T> first,
    IEnumerable<T> second) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    using (var firstIterator = first.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!firstIterator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield break;
        }

        using (var secondIterator = second.GetEnumerator())
        {
            if (!secondIterator.MoveNext())
            {
                yield break;
            }
            T firstValue = firstIterator.Current;
            T secondValue = secondIterator.Current;

            while (true)
            {
                int comparison = firstValue.CompareTo(secondValue);
                if (comparison == 0) // firstValue == secondValue
                {
                    yield return firstValue;
                }
                else if (comparison < 0) // firstValue < secondValue
                {
                    if (!firstIterator.MoveNext())
                    {
                        yield break;
                    }
                    firstValue = firstIterator.Current;
                }
                else // firstValue > secondValue
                {
                    if (!secondIterator.MoveNext())
                    {
                        yield break;
                    }
                    secondValue = secondIterator.Current;
                }  
            }                
        }
    }
}

(You could take an IComparer<T> if you wanted instead of relying on T being comparable.)

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thanks alot Jon Skeet –  theIrishUser May 23 '12 at 12:44
    
Assuming MillionIntegerList has many more members than the TwoThousandIntegerList, would it be faster this way? var common = TwoThousandIntegerList.Intersect(MillionIntegerList).ToList(); –  Eren Ersönmez May 23 '12 at 14:21
2  
@ErenErsönmez: No, because that would build a hashset of the larger set. The documentation in MSDN is actually incorrect when it comes to Intersect - see msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2010/12/30/… for more information. –  Jon Skeet May 23 '12 at 14:46
    
Call me crazy but I don't like this answer, because it relies on the implementation details of the LINQ Intersect method (something that most people don't know). Instead, like Daniel's answer I would prefer to sort the blacklist (cheap and fast) then use a single for loop to implement a merge-type algorithm. However, if you do use Intersect, you should include a comment that explains why. –  jnylen May 23 '12 at 18:48
1  
@OldPro: When I answered the question, we didn't know that MillionIntegerList is sorted - it's not in the original question. Note that my answer now includes the original approach, a hash-based approach which doesn't rely on any implementation details, and also the sort-then-walk approach. –  Jon Skeet May 23 '12 at 19:05
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Since the large list is sorted. You might get the best results by sorting the small list (very quick) and then doing a linear merge. You'll only need to look at each item in the large (and small) list once, and there will be no need for a Hashtable to be created in the background.

See the merge function part of MergeSort for an idea on how to do this.

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Hope you don't mind - I've added a generic implementation of this part to my answer. –  Jon Skeet May 23 '12 at 18:57
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What you need is Enumerable.Except Method (IEnumerable, IEnumerable) in my opinion

check here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb300779.aspx

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Your approach requires O(n*n) time. Consider these optimizations:

  • 1)

    If your integers are not too large, you can use array of bool (for example if the biggest possible integer is 1000000 use bool[] b = new bool[1000000]). Now to add a number K to blacklist use b[K] = true. Check is trivial. This works in O(n). You can also use BitArray

  • 2)

    Integers can be big enough. Use binary search tree for storing blacklist (for example SortedSet). it has O(logN) insert and retrieve time. So in all it is O(N*logN). The syntax is just the same as for List (Add(int K), Contains(int K)), duplicates are ignored

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+1 for mentioning the binary search. - If the larger list is already sorted and its elements can cheaply be accessed by index (like in an array) a binary search algorithm is almost trivial to implement on it, reducing the cost to O(n*log(m)) while avoiding to copy all data to another data structure like a tree or hashmap. –  Hanno Binder May 23 '12 at 15:14
    
Yes. if "blacklist" won't be changed in future, then it can be sorted and items can be found using binary search without any additional structures like trees. .NET already has implementation for sorting (Array.Sort and list.Sort) and binary searching (Array.BinarySearch and list.BinarySearch) –  Oleg Golovkov May 24 '12 at 6:39
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Use a HashSet for blocked list.

foreach(integer i in MillionIntegerList)
{
        //check if blockedlist contains i
        //do what ever you like. 
}
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I think the best solution is to use a Bloom filter and it case the Bloom filter says an element may be in the blacklist, just check if is not a false positive (which can be done in O(Log(n)) if the blacklist is sorted). This solution is time efficient and uses almost no additional space which makes it far better than using a hashset.

This is the solution Google uses for the blacklist in Chrome.

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3  
Let me explain my downvote. 1) it doesn't solve the problem (false positives) 2) nowhere do you mention it is probabilistic and doesn't solve the actual problem 3) Chrome actually uses the filter only to decide to check a web service to actually blacklist. –  ex0du5 May 23 '12 at 14:48
    
1) False positives are very uncommon so it shouldn't be a problem. –  Thomash May 23 '12 at 14:50
    
2) Indeed I didn't explain everything about the Blomm filter but I consider that anyone can click on the link and read the Wikipedia article. –  Thomash May 23 '12 at 14:51
1  
3) So Chrome does exactly what I suggest to do! –  Thomash May 23 '12 at 14:52
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How about doing a binary search on the longer list, since it's sorted.

foreach(integer blacklisted in TwoThousandIntegerList)
{
    integer i  = MillionIntegerList.binarySearch(blacklisted)
    if(i==blacklisted){
          //Do your stuff
    } 
}

This solution only costs O(m log n) time, where m is the size of the small list and n is the size of the longer list. Caveat: This solution assumes the MillionIntegerList has no duplicates values.

If that isn't the case, then you can just iterate though the repeats since they must lie in a contiguous block. For this, I'm going to assume that the MillionInterList is a list of records, each with a value and an index.

foreach(integer blacklisted in TwoThousandIntegerList)
{
    integer index = MillionIntegerList.binarySearch(blacklisted)
    while(MillionIntegerList[index].value == blacklisted){
          //Do your stuff
          ++index;
    } 
}

This solution costs O(m log n + mk) where k is the average number of duplicates per blacklisted integer found in MillionInterList.

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use Except method for List. This will work

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