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I have an Android app using OpenGL ES 2.0. I need to draw 10 lines from an array each of which are described by a start point and an end point. So there are 10 lines = 20 points = 60 floats values. None of the points are connected so each pair of points in the array is unrelated to the others, hence I draw with GL_LINES.

I draw them by putting the values into a float buffer and calling some helper code like this:

public void drawLines(FloatBuffer vertexBuffer, float lineWidth,
        int numPoints, float colour[]) {
    GLES20.glLineWidth(lineWidth);
    drawShape(vertexBuffer, GLES20.GL_LINES, numPoints, colour);
}

protected void drawShape(FloatBuffer vertexBuffer, int drawType,
        int numPoints, float colour[]) {
    // ... set shader ...
    GLES20.glDrawArrays(drawType, 0, numPoints);
}

The drawLines takes the float buffer (60 floats), a linewidth, the number of points (20) and a 4 float colour value array. I haven't shown the shader setting code but it basically exposes the colour variable to uniform uColour value.

The fragment shader that picks up uColour just plugs it straight into the output.

/* Fragment */
precision mediump float;

uniform vec4 uColour;
uniform float uTime;

void main() {
    gl_FragColor = uColour;
}

The vertex shader:

uniform mat4 uMVPMatrix;

attribute vec4 vPosition;

void main() {
    gl_Position = uMVPMatrix * vPosition;
}

But now I want to do something different. I want every line in my buffer to have a different colour. The colours are a function of the position of the line in the array. I want to shade the beginning line white, the last dark gray and lines between a gradation between the two, e.g. #ffffff, #eeeeee, #dddddd etc.

I could obviously just draw each line individually plugging a new value into uColour each time but that is inefficient. I don't want to call GL 10 times when I could call it once and modify the value in a shader each time around.

Perhaps I could declare a uniform value called uVertexCount in my vertex shader? Prior to the draw I set uVertexCount to 0 and for each time the vertex shader is called I increment this value. The fragment shader could determine the line index by looking at uVertexCount. It could then interpolate a value for the colour between some start and end value or some other means. But this depends if every line or point is considered a primitive or the whole array of lines is a single primitive.

Is this feasible? I don't know how many times the vertex shader is called per fragment shader. Are the calls interleaved in a way such as this to make it viable, i.e. vertex 0, vertex 1, x * fragment, vertex 2, vertex 3, x * fragment etc.

Does anyone know of some reasonable sample code that might demonstrate the concept or point me to some other way of doing something similar?

share|improve this question
    
Why not use color as an attribute? Add the colour information in your VertexBuffer. –  omercan1993 May 23 '12 at 12:53
    
I could add it as an attribute but I still need to know the point/line index in the fragment shader in order to know which colour out of the attribute that I should use. i.e. if I passed an array of 10 colours as an attribute how does my fragment shader know which one of those 10 it should be using? –  locka May 23 '12 at 12:57
    
no its done automatically... you need the index if you have an uniform array, but not when you have an attribute. One attribute is connected to only one vertex. So each of your vertice has a position and a colour. –  omercan1993 May 23 '12 at 13:04
    
Could you please show your vertexshader? :) –  omercan1993 May 23 '12 at 13:05
    
I added it above just there. –  locka May 23 '12 at 13:33
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Add color information into your Vertexbuffer (Floatbuffer) and use the attribute in your shader.

Example vertexbuffer:

uniform mat4 uMVPMatrix;

attribute vec4 vPosition;
attribute vec3 vColor;

varying vec3 color;

void main() {
    gl_Position = uMVPMatrix * vPosition;
    color = vColor;
}

Example fragmentshader:

precision mediump float;

varying vec3 color;

void main() {
    gl_FragColor = color;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are you suggesting I use glDrawElements instead of glDrawArray here in some way to push vColor into the vector shader? Does color end up being interpolated or anything from this or would I have to supply the same colour to the start / end point to ensure the varying value does not change? I'll try and give this a go tonight to see how I get on. –  locka May 23 '12 at 14:26
2  
I think I've got it now. I have to bind glVertexAttribPointer / glEnableVertexAttribArray to an array of floats for the colours. I probably have to double up the colours for each end of the line but that should be simple enough. I'll post an update when I get somewhere with this. –  locka May 23 '12 at 14:51
    
+1 Yes this is the right way :D –  omercan1993 May 23 '12 at 15:42
1  
Got this working, thanks! –  locka May 23 '12 at 23:09
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