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I have a list: List<MyClass> MyList = new List<MyClass>();.

MyClass has methods SetBool and IsTrue. I have to set every object of this list to false (obj.SetBool(false)).

There are 2 possible ways:

First:

foreach (MyClass obj in MyList)
{
    obj.SetBool(false)
}

Second:

List<MyClass> MyList2 = MyList.Where(c => c.IsTrue()).ToList();

foreach (MyClass obj in MyList2)
{
    obj.SetBool(false)
}

If I use first one it may be slow because it changes every element. The second way can be slow too, because it has to find objects first.

So my question is: Which one will be faster (I may have very large number of elements in list) and why?

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1  
Why not test the same using a StopWatch ? –  V4Vendetta May 23 '12 at 12:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Fastest would be the combination:

foreach (MyClass obj in MyList)
{
    if (obj.IsTrue())
        obj.SetBool(false)
}

But the difference with your first version will only be meaningful when SetBool() does some extensive validations or computation, and is much more expensive than Istrue().

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IsTrue is method not field or property. –  Nikhil Agrawal May 23 '12 at 13:00
    
@NikhilAgrawal You're right, thanks. It doesn't really change the answer but I fixed it anyway. –  Pete May 23 '12 at 13:02
    
@NikhilAgrawal you are right but it does not make great difference now. –  Leri May 23 '12 at 13:03

Even faster one could be (but like everything have to be measured in your specific case) is use of for

for(int i=0;i<MyList.Count;i++)
{
    if (MyList[i].Istrue())
        MyList[i].SetBool(false)
}

All this optimization are context sensitive.

A lot depdends on:

  • your list size
  • true values destribution in that list
  • does SetBool method do something "heavy"
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First will be shorter. Second one will be lengthy.

Why ?

Let us say you have 100 items in list.

For first snippet it will iterate over 100 items only.

Whereas for second snippet it will loop over 100 then takeout 15 (let us assume). Then it will iterate over those 15.

So basically it iterated over 115 for a list of 100 items.

Instead you can check this way

foreach (MyClass obj in MyList)
{
    if (obj.IsTrue())
        obj.SetBool(false)
}

This will iterate over all of them but will call SetBool() only where it is true

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it depends, if SetBool is an expensive function, then it does matter. And again, if the isTrue is an expensive function, then again, it does matter.

but anyway, instead of using your second way, i would rather use

foreach (MyClass obj in MyList.Where(c => c.IsTrue()))
{
    obj.SetBool(false)
}

this would decrease speed and memory consumption compared to your implementation. But again, you have to measure it. if it takes longer to check, if the item IsTrue then setting the object, then just use your first way. if it is the other way around, then use my method.

in terms of Big O notation, both run in O(n)

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For every reasonable implementation of SetBool the first version should be faster.

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