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Why are there sometimes meaningless do/while and if/else statements in C/C++ macros?

When one needs to execute multiple statements within preprocessor macro, it's usually written like

#define X(a) do { f1(a); f2(a); } while(0)

so when this macro is used inside expressions like:

if (...)
    X(a);

it would not be messed up.

The question is: wherever I've seen such expression, it's always do { ... } while(0);. Is there any reason to prefer such notion over (in my opinion more clear one) if (1) { ... }? Or am I wrong in my observations and they are equally popular?

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marked as duplicate by ChrisF, Blue Moon, Magnus Hoff, Steve Fallows, Wladimir Palant May 23 '12 at 14:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
#define ever (;;) then for ever { ... } –  hexa May 23 '12 at 13:02
2  
@KingsIndian the Q you linked to asked why such statements exist at all. aland here wants to know why one is preferable to the other, I think that's a perfectly valid, and also different question. –  penelope May 23 '12 at 13:13
    
@penelope Moreover if I say dup, then it's not going to become dup right away. At least 4 other people have to agree with me and also it can be re-opened if community thinks all 5 close-voters got it wrong. –  Blue Moon May 23 '12 at 13:23
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Nope, you're not wrong.

There's actually a nice reason:

#define my_code if (1) { ... }

if (1)
    my_code;

The problem is with the ; ! It shouldn't be there... and that would just look strange and not in the spirit of the language. You can either choose to have a code that expands in to two ; in a row, or a code that looks un-c-ish :)

On the other hand, the do-while construction does not have that problem.


Also, as others mentioned, there's an else problem:

if (1)
    my_code;
else { ... }

Ignoring the ; issuse, the else block now belongs to the wrong if.

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if can be as safe as do/while only if there is else branch. E.g.:

#define X(a) if(1) { f1(a); f2(a); } else{}

Is as safe as:

#define X(a) do { f1(a); f2(a); } while(0)

So that the user can't do:

X(...) else ...;

One difference is that when using do/while it requires a ; at the end, whereas if/else doesn't.

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your solution still has the ; issue - you could use it in code as if (condition) X(a) without ;, it would not force the user to end his statements, producing wired un-semicolon-ed code –  penelope May 23 '12 at 13:12
    
I'd say if{}else{} is more universal because it can be used with or without ;. Personally, I don't like macros looking like plain code, so I prefer no ; after a macro. –  Maxim Yegorushkin May 23 '12 at 13:24
    
I'm accepting penelope's answer since it covers both differences between two cases in question. No offence meant. –  aland May 23 '12 at 13:37
    
No worries, it's your question. –  Maxim Yegorushkin May 23 '12 at 13:40
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Consider this:

if(foo)
    X(a);
else
    whatever();

This would expand to:

if(foo)
    if(1) { ... }
else
    whatever();

Which is bad because now the else belongs to the wrong if.

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Using do... while allows you to break out if necessary.

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break out of what? he wants to use/not use do-while as a macro –  penelope May 23 '12 at 13:08
3  
To break out the body of the macro early if necessary. It's used all over the place in the linux source codes. –  James May 23 '12 at 13:11
    
To me, just a half-scentence explanation looks a bit confusing and unocnvincing. Could you add a code snippet that demonstrates your point? –  penelope May 23 '12 at 13:15
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When you use #define X(a) do { ... } while(0) form, it forces you to put ; at the end of the statement X(1).

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