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I have the following code, which is a part of the algorithm that I am following. as you see I need to do some calculation for 10 different bands. and will end up with a matrix for each band that I need to recreate an image from it, the problem is that I dont know how to create/hold the 10 different matrix on the while loop, then after the while loop I can construct the images one by one. if you have any idea please let me know thank you

cv::Mat _reconstructionMatrix(height,width,CV_8UC1);
_reconsPointer = _reconstructionMatrix.ptr<uchar>(0);   

    while(_bandIteration<_bandsNumber){                     
if(_mainMatrix.isContinuous())
{
    nCols *= nRows;
    nRows = 1;
}
//for all the pixels 
for(int i = 0; i < nRows; i++)
{           
    p = _mainMatrix.ptr<uchar>(i);
    //in the images
    for (int  j = 0; j < nCols; j++)
    {               
        if(_pCounter<_totalImgNO){              
            ....
        }else{                                                      
            ...

            _reconsPointer[_resultFlag]=_summation; 
            _resultFlag++;

            ...             
        }
    }                   
}           

_bandIteration++;
}
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your question is a bit vague. But if you are asking simply how to create/hold the 10 different matrix on the while loop? then you can use STL vectors as normal.

#include<vector>
...   
std::vector<cv::Mat> listOfMatrices;
...       
cv::Mat M = SomehowGetMatrix();
listOfMatrices.push_back(M);

If this is not what you are looking for, then please provide more detail to your question.

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yep, my question is how to hold the matrices, but related to your answer: std:vectors makes my code very slow, do you have any other suggrstion? –  user261002 May 23 '12 at 14:08
    
@user261002 I suggest you profile and figure out where you are losing time. If it is due to cv::Mat copies, you could consider a vector of pointers dynamically allocated cv::Mats (or smart pointers thereof). –  juanchopanza May 23 '12 at 14:15
1  
@user261002 Since cv::Mat uses reference counting, I think, copying it should have negligable overhead. So I would be surprised if it really was the std::vectors that make your code very slow. –  Christian Rau May 23 '12 at 15:21
    
Yeah, I have a hard time imagining that the std::vector stuff is to blame for slowness unless you have a very large number of very small matrices and are not doing anything complex with them. –  Hannes Ovrén May 24 '12 at 6:39
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