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I have a class that has overloaded methods.

   public class MyCal extends GregorianCalendar {

   //constructor
   public MyCal(Date date) {
     super();
     setTime(date);
   }

   boolean isSameDay(Date date) {
      return (isSameDay(new MyCal(date))) {
   }

   boolean isSameDay(MyCal cal) {
       if (...) {
         return true;
       } else {
         return false;
       }
   }

   //abstract String toString(String pattern) {};
   //if I have this I can't call new MyCal(date) from above
}

Now I want the class to be abstract (need the sub classes to implement a few other methods), and still avoid all the logic of the first isSameDay method (calling the second one). If it was just this method it would be ok I could do it, but this situation is replicated on many other overloaded methods.

The class being abstract I can't instantiate it and so the method isSameDay(date) will report an error... and really don't want to have the logic on all methods, it would make the class enormous as well as harder to maintain. Can anybody have a good way of doing this? Thank you in advance.

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4  
What is your question, exactly? Is it that you want to be able to make this class abstract and still instantiate it? –  Bohemian May 23 '12 at 13:54
    
I don't understand either. Avoid what logic? –  David B May 23 '12 at 13:55
1  
What's the problem? An abstract method may define non-abstract methods. And these methods may be final if you don't want subclasses to override them. –  JB Nizet May 23 '12 at 13:55
    
It's really hard to understand your question. I don't think the quoted code really helps. You should if you want to get some answers edit your question and list the classes you are writing, the contract of each class and method, and the global goal you are trying to reach - and please don't ask your friends to upvote the question - this is NOT a great question ;=) –  Samuel Rossille May 23 '12 at 13:56
    
Instead of extending GregorianCalendar, why don't you create a new class that holds an instance of a GregorianCalendar that can be used when needed - then define a new contract for your class that accepts only MyCal params and not Dates - making it explicit to the client that what is happening is specific to the new MyCal class rather than general to Dates. –  Russell May 23 '12 at 13:58
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think that what he means is that he wants to instantiate an object of the derived class in the parent class.

I suggest doing something like this:

Parent Class

public class MyCal extends GregorianCalendar {  
(...)
boolean isSameDay(Date date) {  
   return (isSameDay(newInstance())) {  
   }  
abstract MyCal newInstance(){}
(...)
}

Derived Class

public class MyDerivedCal extends MyCal{  
(...)
abstract MyCal newInstance(){
   return new MyDerivedCal();
   }
(...)
}

Pardon my possible java syntax mistakes....

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1  
I think this will solve my problem. I'll try it. –  Nuno Gonçalves May 23 '12 at 14:27
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Remove the logic that requires instantiation of the abstract class. In your example above you can effectively do this by reversing the roles of the methods you defined:

boolean isSameDay(Date date) {
    if (...) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    } 
}


boolean isSameDay(MyCal cal) {
    if(cal == null) return false;
    return (isSameDay(cal.getTime()));
}

Extend to your other methods as needed.

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1  
+1 your answer made me understand the question :) –  pgras May 23 '12 at 14:03
    
This won't help if the omitted logic (whether it isSameDay) needs to call those abstract methods. –  CKuck May 23 '12 at 14:10
    
Not sure I follow you @CKuck. You can call abstract methods the same as regular ones. –  Perception May 23 '12 at 14:57
    
Assuming the method isSameDay(MyCal cal) calls an abstract method of MyCal. Now you have to get an instance of MyCal to do so. Your solution doesn't help in this case. (Nuno liking Joao's answer might imply this be the case) –  CKuck May 23 '12 at 15:04
    
You would not need to create an instance of MyCal if you are passing one into the method already. Also, note that the whole premise of this solution is to remove the necessity of instantiating concrete implementations of the abstract class. –  Perception May 23 '12 at 15:06
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You could define a method getMyCal(date)

public class MyCal extends GregorianCalendar {

    abstract MyCal getMyCal(Date date);

    // further implementation
}

and instead of using new MyCal(date) you can use getMyCal(date) in your methods.

The implementations of the abstract class have only to implement the getMyCal method.

public ConcreteCal extends MyCal {

    MyCal getMyCal(Date date) {
        return new ConcreteCal(date);
    }
}
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It's really hard to tell what you are asking, but I'm going to guess...

If you want to make this class abstract, but still instantiate it, you can't (you can't instantiate an abstract class), but you can do this:

public abstract class MyCal ... {
    ...
    abstract String toString(String pattern);
}

public class MyCalBasic extends MyCal {
    String toString(String pattern) {
        // some vanilla impl
    }
}

And just use MyCalBasic instead of MyCal when you want the "vanilla" version of the class.

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